These Prawns Really Hit the Spot

Spot Prawns hang out in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of the U.S. and Canada. You can find them from Alaska all the way down to San Diego. They’re a very sustainable shrimp and come from a well-managed fishery focused on protecting the ecosystem. 
 
Which wine? 
Our wine expert Keith has two ideas for you when Spot Prawns are on your menu:

Lafond Chardonnay (CA) One of our best sellers, this lighter, fruity chardonnay is a summer favorite and works great with shrimp dishes of all types.

Jolie Folle Rose (France) Crisp rose is a beautiful pairing for our shrimp delights. The fresh fruit notes of strawberry and cherry and the gorgeous color light up your table and your meal. 
 

Recipe
So, a saute with garlic is perfect for Spot Prawns, but if you feel like flexing your kitchen muscles a bit, here is a recipe from Saveur you can try: 

Grilled Spot Prawns with Finger Lime and Basil
Serves 4
 
Ingredients
2 lbs. spot prawns, unpeeled and heads on
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/2 lemon, juiced
1/2 bunch basil leaves, roughly chopped
5 finger limes
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
 
Instructions
1. Preheat covered grill or grill pan to medium-high. Using a sharp pair of scissors, cut down the middle of the prawn tail shells to reveal and remove the central vein. Season prawns liberally with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Grill about 2 to 3 minutes per side, until just done. Transfer to a platter to rest a few minutes.

2. In a small mixing bowl, combine olive oil, lemon juice, and basil. Cut one end off each finger lime and gently squeeze the tiny juice pellets ("lime caviar") out of the rind into the bowl. Season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Drizzle the dressing over rested prawns and serve immediately.

Our shrimp party runs through Tuesday, so come on in today. You're running out of time to try an assortment of new shrimp from around the world! 

How to Perfectly Prep and Cook Shrimp

Shelling
Beginning at the legs, peel the shell up toward the top of the shrimp. Repeat on the other side until the shell slips off. If desired, gently pull on the tail portion of the shell and remove it.

Deveining
Whether or not to devein shrimp is a matter of personal preference. In general, small and medium shrimp do not need deveining except for cosmetic purposes. However, the vein of larger shrimp should generally be removed. Peel shell, then use a small, sharp knife to make a shallow slit along its back from the head end to the tail. Rinse under cold running water to remove the vein, using the tip of a knife, if necessary.

Butterfly
Split the back of the shrimp with a small sharp knife without separating it into two halves. Press the shrimp down flat like a butterfly.

Storing
Put shrimp in the coldest part of the refrigerator at 32-38°F in a covered container wrapped in ice. Replace ice as it melts and drain off the water. For maximum quality, cook fresh shrimp within one to two days of purchase. If planned use is more than two days following purchase, freshness is better maintained if shrimp are frozen the day of purchase. Cooked shrimp may be stored in the refrigerator for two to three days. Freeze or refrigerate leftovers promptly.

Freezing
Freeze shrimp raw, with shell on, completely submerged in water. This prevents freezer burn and drying out and retains flavor and texture. Use heavy-duty freezer bags or any container that will hold water without puncturing. Freeze in amounts that you plan to use for each meal. Raw, headless shrimp in the shell maintain quality during freezing longer than frozen cooked shrimp, and they are best if frozen at the peak of freshness. Frozen raw shrimp maintains quality for approximately 6-7 months though it can be kept longer, whereas home-frozen cooked shrimp begins to lose quality after approximately one month.

Thawing
Run frozen shrimp under cold running water until completely thawed, or thaw shrimp in the refrigerator. Never thaw in hot water or at room temperature.

Boiling
Bring salted water to a rolling boil. Spices such as crab boil are optional. Add shrimp with shell on. Boil 2-4 minutes, depending on size. Remove from water and run under cold water. Chill or serve hot, with cocktail sauce. Another really easy way to do this is to shell and devein shrimp and bring 2 quarts of water to a rolling boil. Salt the water lightly and add lemon juice, if desired. Shut off the heat and pour the shrimp in the water, being careful not to splash yourself. Cover and let steep for 3-6 minutes, until the flesh is opaque all the way through. Immediately remove from hot water and chill by putting them in a bowl in an ice water bath.

Frying
Peel shrimp and devein, if needed. Fry battered shrimp, in small batches, in oil at 350°F until golden brown. Stir-fry unbattered shrimp in butter or oil until pink, usually 3-4 minutes.

Grilling
Peel shrimp and devein, if needed. Either marinate shrimp for a few hours or brush with butter and garlic. Cook on grill until pink on both sides. They cook very fast, so keep an eye on them. Time depends on how hot the coals are.

And of course, our Seafood department is filled with experts ready to answer any questions you have about preparing shrimp or any seafood items. Chat them up when you stop by Shrimp Fest, which runs through August 2! 

How to Perfectly Prep and Cook Shrimp

Shelling
Beginning at the legs, peel the shell up toward the top of the shrimp. Repeat on the other side until the shell slips off. If desired, gently pull on the tail portion of the shell and remove it.

Deveining
Whether or not to devein shrimp is a matter of personal preference. In general, small and medium shrimp do not need deveining except for cosmetic purposes. However, the vein of larger shrimp should generally be removed. Peel shell, then use a small, sharp knife to make a shallow slit along its back from the head end to the tail. Rinse under cold running water to remove the vein, using the tip of a knife, if necessary.

Butterfly
Split the back of the shrimp with a small sharp knife without separating it into two halves. Press the shrimp down flat like a butterfly.

Storing
Put shrimp in the coldest part of the refrigerator at 32-38°F in a covered container wrapped in ice. Replace ice as it melts and drain off the water. For maximum quality, cook fresh shrimp within one to two days of purchase. If planned use is more than two days following purchase, freshness is better maintained if shrimp are frozen the day of purchase. Cooked shrimp may be stored in the refrigerator for two to three days. Freeze or refrigerate leftovers promptly.

Freezing
Freeze shrimp raw, with shell on, completely submerged in water. This prevents freezer burn and drying out and retains flavor and texture. Use heavy-duty freezer bags or any container that will hold water without puncturing. Freeze in amounts that you plan to use for each meal. Raw, headless shrimp in the shell maintain quality during freezing longer than frozen cooked shrimp, and they are best if frozen at the peak of freshness. Frozen raw shrimp maintains quality for approximately 6-7 months though it can be kept longer, whereas home-frozen cooked shrimp begins to lose quality after approximately one month.

Thawing
Run frozen shrimp under cold running water until completely thawed, or thaw shrimp in the refrigerator. Never thaw in hot water or at room temperature.

Boiling
Bring salted water to a rolling boil. Spices such as crab boil are optional. Add shrimp with shell on. Boil 2-4 minutes, depending on size. Remove from water and run under cold water. Chill or serve hot, with cocktail sauce. Another really easy way to do this is to shell and devein shrimp and bring 2 quarts of water to a rolling boil. Salt the water lightly and add lemon juice, if desired. Shut off the heat and pour the shrimp in the water, being careful not to splash yourself. Cover and let steep for 3-6 minutes, until the flesh is opaque all the way through. Immediately remove from hot water and chill by putting them in a bowl in an ice water bath.

Frying
Peel shrimp and devein, if needed. Fry battered shrimp, in small batches, in oil at 350°F until golden brown. Stir-fry unbattered shrimp in butter or oil until pink, usually 3-4 minutes.

Grilling
Peel shrimp and devein, if needed. Either marinate shrimp for a few hours or brush with butter and garlic. Cook on grill until pink on both sides. They cook very fast, so keep an eye on them. Time depends on how hot the coals are.

And of course, our Seafood department is filled with experts ready to answer any questions you have about preparing shrimp or any seafood items. Chat them up when you stop by Shrimp Fest, which runs through August 2! 

How to Perfectly Prep and Cook Shrimp

Shelling
Beginning at the legs, peel the shell up toward the top of the shrimp. Repeat on the other side until the shell slips off. If desired, gently pull on the tail portion of the shell and remove it.

Deveining
Whether or not to devein shrimp is a matter of personal preference. In general, small and medium shrimp do not need deveining except for cosmetic purposes. However, the vein of larger shrimp should generally be removed. Peel shell, then use a small, sharp knife to make a shallow slit along its back from the head end to the tail. Rinse under cold running water to remove the vein, using the tip of a knife, if necessary.

Butterfly
Split the back of the shrimp with a small sharp knife without separating it into two halves. Press the shrimp down flat like a butterfly.

Storing
Put shrimp in the coldest part of the refrigerator at 32-38°F in a covered container wrapped in ice. Replace ice as it melts and drain off the water. For maximum quality, cook fresh shrimp within one to two days of purchase. If planned use is more than two days following purchase, freshness is better maintained if shrimp are frozen the day of purchase. Cooked shrimp may be stored in the refrigerator for two to three days. Freeze or refrigerate leftovers promptly.

Freezing
Freeze shrimp raw, with shell on, completely submerged in water. This prevents freezer burn and drying out and retains flavor and texture. Use heavy-duty freezer bags or any container that will hold water without puncturing. Freeze in amounts that you plan to use for each meal. Raw, headless shrimp in the shell maintain quality during freezing longer than frozen cooked shrimp, and they are best if frozen at the peak of freshness. Frozen raw shrimp maintains quality for approximately 6-7 months though it can be kept longer, whereas home-frozen cooked shrimp begins to lose quality after approximately one month.

Thawing
Run frozen shrimp under cold running water until completely thawed, or thaw shrimp in the refrigerator. Never thaw in hot water or at room temperature.

Boiling
Bring salted water to a rolling boil. Spices such as crab boil are optional. Add shrimp with shell on. Boil 2-4 minutes, depending on size. Remove from water and run under cold water. Chill or serve hot, with cocktail sauce. Another really easy way to do this is to shell and devein shrimp and bring 2 quarts of water to a rolling boil. Salt the water lightly and add lemon juice, if desired. Shut off the heat and pour the shrimp in the water, being careful not to splash yourself. Cover and let steep for 3-6 minutes, until the flesh is opaque all the way through. Immediately remove from hot water and chill by putting them in a bowl in an ice water bath.

Frying
Peel shrimp and devein, if needed. Fry battered shrimp, in small batches, in oil at 350°F until golden brown. Stir-fry unbattered shrimp in butter or oil until pink, usually 3-4 minutes.

Grilling
Peel shrimp and devein, if needed. Either marinate shrimp for a few hours or brush with butter and garlic. Cook on grill until pink on both sides. They cook very fast, so keep an eye on them. Time depends on how hot the coals are.

And of course, our Seafood department is filled with experts ready to answer any questions you have about preparing shrimp or any seafood items. Chat them up when you stop by Shrimp Fest, which runs through August 2! 

Let’s Talk Langoustine

Lauding Langoustine
Acclaimed food writer and Food Network regular Simon Majumdar, who travels the globe in search of the very best meals on the planet, says Langoustines rank in his top 10 food experiences in the world. Did you catch that? The man said In The. World.
 
Bon Appétit magazine hailed Langoustines as “the new marker of haute cuisine” and Esben Holmboe Bang, chef of Maaemo in Oslo, Norway, declared: “Nothing highlights the elegance and bounty of the sea better than Langoustines.”
 
So, I think it goes without saying that when you bring Langoustine home for dinner, your seafood dishes – and your entire frame of reference for “shrimp” — are about to step into an entirely new state of being.
 
Preparation
If you purchase whole Langoustines, boil them in salted water and serve whole with garlic aioli. Guests can dig in family-style and discard shells in a shared bowl. If you choose to purchase just the tail meat, defrost completely and sauté with olive oil, garlic, minced red chili and fresh, chopped parsley. Add to pasta or serve as-is with bread and salad.To make sure you get the full Langoustine experience, you can always ask our fish mongers for advice on properly prepping and cooking! We want your meal to be perfect, so you, too, will be raving that Langoustines are one of the finest foods you’ve ever had the pleasure to enjoy. In. The. World.
 
What else? Wine! 
OK, what more needs to be said? What more can be said? Well, other than saying you need to hustle over to Central Market and experience the gloriousness that is Langoustine! While you’re there, don’t forget to pick up some wine. We suggest:
 
Au Contraire Chardonnay: (CA) With a touch of oak and a bit of butter, this Chardonnay loves seafood of all types and would be the perfect companion to exquisite Langoustine tails.

Our shrimply irresistible celebration runs through August 2, so come on by and explore new shrimp from around the world!
 

On a Roll with Rock Shrimp

You can use them in your favorite shrimp recipe or try one of the two options below for something new.

And if you're a wine lover interested in pairings, we suggest:
 
Vibracions Cava, a sparkling wine from Spain. It's zesty and crisp and will be wonderful with summer shrimp salads.

Cielo Prosecco from Italy has lovely apple and pear fruit flavors and delicate bubbles. Total refreshment when enjoyed with shrimp appetizers of all sorts.

Tagliatelle with Rock Shrimp, Corn, and Burst Cherry Tomatoes
 
Ingredients:
4 ears corn, shucked
Extra-virgin olive oil, plus high quality extra-virgin olive oil
3 cloves garlic, smashed
Pinch crushed red pepper flakes
1 pint heirloom cherry tomatoes, assorted sizes and colors
1 1/2 to 2 cups vegetable or chicken stock
Kosher salt
1 pound fresh tagliatelle
1 1/2 pounds rock shrimp, rinsed and picked through for shells
1/2 cup grated Parmesan
 
Directions:
Preheat a grill or broiler. Grill or broil the corn until it is dark brown on all sides. Cut the kernels off the cob and reserve. Once the kernels have been removed from the cob, run your knife along the cob to get any residual pieces of the kernels. Reserve.
 
Coat a large wide pot, over medium-high heat, with olive oil. Toss in the garlic and crushed red pepper. When the garlic becomes golden and is very aromatic, remove it from the pan and discard. Toss in the cherry tomatoes and roll them around in the oil. Add 1 cup of stock and season with salt. Reduce the heat to medium and let the tomatoes cook until they start to burst and give off their juices. This will take about 8 to 10 minutes.
 
Bring a large pot of well-salted water to a boil over medium heat.
 
Add the corn kernels to the pot with the tomatoes. Stir to combine and add 1/2 cup of stock if the liquid level is very low.
 
Drop the pasta into the boiling water and cook for 2 to 3 minutes, or longer if using dried pasta. Toss the shrimp into the pot with the tomatoes and stir to combine.
 
Drain the pasta from the cooking water, reserving 1/2 cup water, and toss immediately into the pot with the tomato mixture. Add in 1/2 cup of the pasta cooking water, if needed. Toss vigorously to combine. Remove from the heat and give a drizzle of high quality finishing oil and a sprinkling of grated Parmesan. Transfer to a serving bowl or platter and serve immediately.

Another way to rock a meal
Want more? Here's another Rock Shrimp recipe you can check out: Pasta with Rock Shrimp, Chile, and Lemon. What I love about this recipe is that you make your own bonito butter to coat the shrimp. Bonito flakes are popular in Japanese cuisine and are made from dried fish. Try it out!

Our Shrimp Fest runs through August 2, so stop by today and see the new varieties we have brought in just for you.

Recipe sources: Food Network, Epicurious

On a Roll with Rock Shrimp

You can use them in your favorite shrimp recipe or try one of the two options below for something new.

And if you're a wine lover interested in pairings, we suggest:
 
Vibracions Cava, a sparkling wine from Spain. It's zesty and crisp and will be wonderful with summer shrimp salads.

Cielo Prosecco from Italy has lovely apple and pear fruit flavors and delicate bubbles. Total refreshment when enjoyed with shrimp appetizers of all sorts.

Tagliatelle with Rock Shrimp, Corn, and Burst Cherry Tomatoes
 
Ingredients:
4 ears corn, shucked
Extra-virgin olive oil, plus high quality extra-virgin olive oil
3 cloves garlic, smashed
Pinch crushed red pepper flakes
1 pint heirloom cherry tomatoes, assorted sizes and colors
1 1/2 to 2 cups vegetable or chicken stock
Kosher salt
1 pound fresh tagliatelle
1 1/2 pounds rock shrimp, rinsed and picked through for shells
1/2 cup grated Parmesan
 
Directions:
Preheat a grill or broiler. Grill or broil the corn until it is dark brown on all sides. Cut the kernels off the cob and reserve. Once the kernels have been removed from the cob, run your knife along the cob to get any residual pieces of the kernels. Reserve.
 
Coat a large wide pot, over medium-high heat, with olive oil. Toss in the garlic and crushed red pepper. When the garlic becomes golden and is very aromatic, remove it from the pan and discard. Toss in the cherry tomatoes and roll them around in the oil. Add 1 cup of stock and season with salt. Reduce the heat to medium and let the tomatoes cook until they start to burst and give off their juices. This will take about 8 to 10 minutes.
 
Bring a large pot of well-salted water to a boil over medium heat.
 
Add the corn kernels to the pot with the tomatoes. Stir to combine and add 1/2 cup of stock if the liquid level is very low.
 
Drop the pasta into the boiling water and cook for 2 to 3 minutes, or longer if using dried pasta. Toss the shrimp into the pot with the tomatoes and stir to combine.
 
Drain the pasta from the cooking water, reserving 1/2 cup water, and toss immediately into the pot with the tomato mixture. Add in 1/2 cup of the pasta cooking water, if needed. Toss vigorously to combine. Remove from the heat and give a drizzle of high quality finishing oil and a sprinkling of grated Parmesan. Transfer to a serving bowl or platter and serve immediately.

Another way to rock a meal
Want more? Here's another Rock Shrimp recipe you can check out: Pasta with Rock Shrimp, Chile, and Lemon. What I love about this recipe is that you make your own bonito butter to coat the shrimp. Bonito flakes are popular in Japanese cuisine and are made from dried fish. Try it out!

Our Shrimp Fest runs through August 2, so stop by today and see the new varieties we have brought in just for you.

Recipe sources: Food Network, Epicurious

Shrimply Irresistible

Here’s a look at the five types of shrimp we’re highlighting this week. If I were you, I’d make plans to try them all! And to try them with a six pack from Alaskan Brewing Co. Alaskan White is a great choice; it's soft and slight sweet flavor has notes of coriander and orange peel that will go great with any of our awesome shrimp. OK, back to the shrimp! I got distracted. You know, beer.
 
Langoustines
Your pasta dishes –and really your entire frame of reference for seafood — are about to step into a completely new world. Enter the Langoustine: a succulent, white shellfish from Scotland, hailed by Bon Appetite magazine as “the new marker of haute cuisine.” Esben Holmboe Bang, chef of Maaemo in Oslo, says: “They have a more complex and delicate taste than lobster. The flavor is sweet, elegant.”
 
Rock Shrimp
Rock shrimp have a rock hard, spiny shell that gives them the appearance of small lobsters, and they do, in fact, have the incredibly sweet flavor and firm texture of lobster. Toss them in summer salads for yourself or for a crowd.    
 
Skull Island Tiger Prawns
We bring these in from the Gulf of Carpentaria in Australia. They are the largest wild-caught prawns in Australia (U/6), making them a great choice for the grill.  Stuff them first or add them to veggie kabobs.
 
Spot Prawns
Spot Prawns are actually shrimp – and they taste like a crab and a lobster. They hang out in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of the U.S. and Canada and come from a well-managed fishery focused on protecting the ecosystem. All you really need to do with these shrimp is sauté with garlic.  
 
U-12 Fresh Gulf Whites
Fresh from the sparkling waters of the Gulf of Mexico, these shrimp have a firm texture and sweet, mild flavor. Grab some corn, potatoes, and sausage, too – these are the perfect shrimp for a backyard shrimp boil!
 
Our Seafood Team can answer any questions you have about flavor, preparation, and selecting the perfect shrimp for you meal, occasion, and personal tastes. So don’t be shy; step on up and ask away. They'll also boil your shrimp for you, if you want! That's just the Central Market way. 

Cooking School & In-Store Events
Check your store's calendar to see if there are cooking school classes in your area and to find out what your local store has planned for you during our Shrimply Irresistible event. 

Our shrimp event runs today through August 2. We look forward to seeing you!

Two Scoops of Texas-Made Treats

Here is a look at a sorbet, a custard, and an ice cream, all of which will have you proud to be a Texan!
 
Savoy Sorbet  
Purified water, fresh herbs, spices, flowers, and fruits blend into icy treats suitable for folks with gluten or dairy allergies, vegans, and absolutely anyone who wants a bright and fresh dessert to ward off the Texas heat. They are even free from GMOs and stabilizers. Try flavors such as Chamomile Orange, Blueberry Sage, Ginger Lemongrass, and Chocolate Fix. The Dallas Observer called them “inspired flavor duos.” We call them summer afternoon must-haves!
 
Wild About Harry’s
Harry is from Hollis. And Hollis is an Oklahoma town that holds sweet memories for Harry. When he was a boy, back during the Depression, his mom would make frozen custard to help beat the hot and dusty Hollis summers. Harry remembers her custard as a "bowl of heaven," made with fresh ingredients from the county store. Today Harry runs a shop sharing his mom’s custard with folks, hoping to make their day a little brighter with flavors like Mint Chocolate Chip, Coffee, and Dreamsicle.
 
Lick
“Honest ice creams.” When Anthony and Chad embarked on their Austin ice cream adventure, this was their goal. They were both from small towns and loved the small, local ice cream shops that featured seasonal flavors and locally sourced ingredients. They wanted to bring this honest approach to their own shop and use only pure, wholesome ingredientsbased on local seasonality and availability. And that’s exactly what you’ll find at their shop and in their pints in Central Market freezers.
 
All of the milk and cream used to make their ice creams comesfrom Mill-King creamery, a family-owned dairy in Central Texas. They are connected with local food artisans, such as chocolatiers, bee keepers — and even butchers — who help enhance the quality and flavor profiles of their ice creams.
 
And then they make everything by hand in their kitchen — from ice cream and sauces syrups, cakes, and marshmallows. They churn every batch, make and roll every waffle cone, and pack each pint by hand to give you the most honest ice creams they possibly can. 

Our Sundae Fun Day event runs through Tuesday and the stores are hosting ice cream socials this weekend — what more reasons could you possibly need to get on in to Central Market?!

Two Scoops of Texas-Made Treats

Here is a look at a sorbet, a custard, and an ice cream, all of which will have you proud to be a Texan!
 
Savoy Sorbet  
Purified water, fresh herbs, spices, flowers, and fruits blend into icy treats suitable for folks with gluten or dairy allergies, vegans, and absolutely anyone who wants a bright and fresh dessert to ward off the Texas heat. They are even free from GMOs and stabilizers. Try flavors such as Chamomile Orange, Blueberry Sage, Ginger Lemongrass, and Chocolate Fix. The Dallas Observer called them “inspired flavor duos.” We call them summer afternoon must-haves!
 
Wild About Harry’s
Harry is from Hollis. And Hollis is an Oklahoma town that holds sweet memories for Harry. When he was a boy, back during the Depression, his mom would make frozen custard to help beat the hot and dusty Hollis summers. Harry remembers her custard as a "bowl of heaven," made with fresh ingredients from the county store. Today Harry runs a shop sharing his mom’s custard with folks, hoping to make their day a little brighter with flavors like Mint Chocolate Chip, Coffee, and Dreamsicle.
 
Lick
“Honest ice creams.” When Anthony and Chad embarked on their Austin ice cream adventure, this was their goal. They were both from small towns and loved the small, local ice cream shops that featured seasonal flavors and locally sourced ingredients. They wanted to bring this honest approach to their own shop and use only pure, wholesome ingredientsbased on local seasonality and availability. And that’s exactly what you’ll find at their shop and in their pints in Central Market freezers.
 
All of the milk and cream used to make their ice creams comesfrom Mill-King creamery, a family-owned dairy in Central Texas. They are connected with local food artisans, such as chocolatiers, bee keepers — and even butchers — who help enhance the quality and flavor profiles of their ice creams.
 
And then they make everything by hand in their kitchen — from ice cream and sauces syrups, cakes, and marshmallows. They churn every batch, make and roll every waffle cone, and pack each pint by hand to give you the most honest ice creams they possibly can. 

Our Sundae Fun Day event runs through Tuesday and the stores are hosting ice cream socials this weekend — what more reasons could you possibly need to get on in to Central Market?!