Is Beef What�s For Dinner? Then You Need These Grilling Tips.

Compatible flavors: Thyme, garlic, onion, dried chile.
Suggested sauces: Blue cheese, butter, horseradish, red wine, béarnaise.
 
Filet Mignon (2-inches thick)
Prep: Take meat out of the refrigerator and let it stand, covered, up to an hour, to come to room temperature. Wipe dry of marinade or juice; brush lightly with oil.
Cooking temperature: Hot to medium-hot coals
Cooking instructions: Place meat on grill 4 inches from coals. Cover grill; turn meat once. Cover loosely with foil and let stand 5-10 minutes before serving.
Internal temperature when done: Rare: 140; Medium Rare: 145; Medium: 160; Well Done: 170
 
Whole Tenderloin
Prep: Take meat out of the refrigerator and let it stand, covered, up to an hour, to come to room temperature. Wipe dry of marinade or juice; brush lightly with oil.
Cooking time: Approximately 12 minutes per pound
Cooking temperature: Medium coals Cooking instructions: Turn every 10 minutes. Do not use a fork to turn meat.
 Internal temperature when done: Rare: 140; Medium Rare: 145; Medium: 160; Well Done: 170
 
Porter House, Sirloin, T-Bone, Ribeye, NY Strip (1 ¼ to 1 ½ inches thick)
Prep: Take meat out of the refrigerator and let it stand, covered, up to an hour, to come to room temperature. Wipe dry of marinade or juice; brush lightly with oil. Cut the fat at 1 1/2-inch intervals to prevent curling.
 Cooking temperature: Medium coals
Cooking instructions: Place steak on grill about 3 inches from coals. Sear 1 minute, then cover. About halfway through cooking, turn steak over, sear for 1 minute then cover grill again. Do not use a fork to turn meat. Cover loosely with foil and let stand 5 minutes before slicing.
Internal temperature when done: Rare: 140; Medium Rare: 145; Medium: 160; Well Done: 170
 
Flanksteak
Prep: Take meat out of the refrigerator and let it stand, covered, up to one hour, to come to room temperature. Wipe dry of marinade or juice; brush lightly with oil. Slash the meat lightly, across the grain, to improve the texture and tenderness.
Cooking temperature: Medium coals Cooking instructions: Place steak on grill about 4 inches from coals. Do not use a fork to turn meat. Cover and grill, turning once. Serve rare to medium. Cover loosely with foil and let stand 5 minutes before slicing. To serve, slice thinly against the grain.
Internal temperature when done: Rare: 140; Medium Rare: 145; Medium: 160

Our expert Meat Cutters can help you pick out the right cut of meat for your tastes and answer any cooking questions you may have. Stop in on your way home tonight! 

Kabob It!

Here are a couple kabob recipes for you, along with some ingredient ideas. Give them a try as they are, or use them as inspiration to create your own skewered masterpieces.  
 
Banana Split on a Spit
 
Gather
2 small bananas, cut into 1 ½”–long pieces
½ pineapple, cored, peeled and cut into 1” chunks
8 fresh cherries, pitted
½ cup pecan, walnut, or coconut oil
½ cup blackstrap molasses or chocolate sauce
 
Directions
Toss bananas, pineapple and cherries in oil and place on skewers.
Grill over medium heat until bananas and pineapple are carmelized.
Remove from heat, allow to cool for a minute, and then remove fruit frow the skewer.
Serve over ice cream with molasses or your favorite chocolate sauce.
 
Makes 4-6 skewers.
 
 
 
Grilled Tropical Salsa Kabobs
 
Gather
½ – ½ cup coconut oil
½ pineapple, peeled, cored & cut into 1” chunks
1 large red bell pepper, cut into 1”-wide strips
2 jalapenos, sliced opoen and deseeded
2 mangoes, peeled, deseded & cut into 1” chunks
½ small red onion, cut into 1” wedges
1 handful of cilantro and/or mint, chopped
2 small limes, halved
Salt & black pepper to taste
 
Directions
Toss all fruits and vegetables in coconut oil.
Skewer and grill until jalapenos are blistered. The mango and pineapple should be caramelized.
Remove from grill and allow to cool.
Remove fruits and vegetables from skewers onto a large cutting board.
Roughly chop onion, bell pepper, pineapple, and mango and place in medium-sized bowl.
Add the juices from the cutting board to the bowl.
Add the juice of the grilled limes over the contents of the bowl and toss with salt, pepper, cilantro and mint to taste.
 
Serve with fish, chicken, pork, or your favorite chips.
 
Serves 6-8
 
 
Other Kabob Flavor Ideas
Lamb + Carrots + Cumin
Shrimp + Leeks + Tomatoes
Salmon + Figs + Shallots
Sweet Potatoes + Apples + Fennel
Okra + Smoked Paprika
Polenta Cubes + Wild Mushrooms
Lamb + Haloumi + Zucchini
Chorizo + Potatoes + Tomatoes
Beef + Potatoes + Chimichurri
Bacon-Wrapped Oysters + Lemon
Shrimp + Eggplant Turmeric
Blue-Cheese-Stuffed Figs

Let us know what fun combinations you come up with! 

Image Credit: Paleo Newbie
 

Kabob It!

Here are a couple kabob recipes for you, along with some ingredient ideas. Give them a try as they are, or use them as inspiration to create your own skewered masterpieces.  
 
Banana Split on a Spit
 
Gather
2 small bananas, cut into 1 ½”–long pieces
½ pineapple, cored, peeled and cut into 1” chunks
8 fresh cherries, pitted
½ cup pecan, walnut, or coconut oil
½ cup blackstrap molasses or chocolate sauce
 
Directions
Toss bananas, pineapple and cherries in oil and place on skewers.
Grill over medium heat until bananas and pineapple are carmelized.
Remove from heat, allow to cool for a minute, and then remove fruit frow the skewer.
Serve over ice cream with molasses or your favorite chocolate sauce.
 
Makes 4-6 skewers.
 
 
 
Grilled Tropical Salsa Kabobs
 
Gather
½ – ½ cup coconut oil
½ pineapple, peeled, cored & cut into 1” chunks
1 large red bell pepper, cut into 1”-wide strips
2 jalapenos, sliced opoen and deseeded
2 mangoes, peeled, deseded & cut into 1” chunks
½ small red onion, cut into 1” wedges
1 handful of cilantro and/or mint, chopped
2 small limes, halved
Salt & black pepper to taste
 
Directions
Toss all fruits and vegetables in coconut oil.
Skewer and grill until jalapenos are blistered. The mango and pineapple should be caramelized.
Remove from grill and allow to cool.
Remove fruits and vegetables from skewers onto a large cutting board.
Roughly chop onion, bell pepper, pineapple, and mango and place in medium-sized bowl.
Add the juices from the cutting board to the bowl.
Add the juice of the grilled limes over the contents of the bowl and toss with salt, pepper, cilantro and mint to taste.
 
Serve with fish, chicken, pork, or your favorite chips.
 
Serves 6-8
 
 
Other Kabob Flavor Ideas
Lamb + Carrots + Cumin
Shrimp + Leeks + Tomatoes
Salmon + Figs + Shallots
Sweet Potatoes + Apples + Fennel
Okra + Smoked Paprika
Polenta Cubes + Wild Mushrooms
Lamb + Haloumi + Zucchini
Chorizo + Potatoes + Tomatoes
Beef + Potatoes + Chimichurri
Bacon-Wrapped Oysters + Lemon
Shrimp + Eggplant Turmeric
Blue-Cheese-Stuffed Figs

Let us know what fun combinations you come up with! 

Image Credit: Paleo Newbie
 

Everyone Will Eat Their Vegetables

We have all kinds of flavors for you to choose from!
 
Balsamic & Roasted Onion
A delicious blend of onions, balsamic, garlic, brown sugar, sea salt, and spices. Just mix with olive oil and melted butter, then toss with Brussels sprouts, potatoes, or any root veggie and grill. Each package makes three batches of grilled veggies.
 
Manchego & Roasted Garlic
Onion, garlic, natural manchego cheese flavor. Mix rub with olive oil and melted butter, then brush on cauliflower “steaks” or sliced potatoes. Each package seasons three batches of veggies.
 
Parmesan Mediterranean
Parmesan cheese, onion, garlic. Mix with olive oil and melted butter, and toss with thick slices of acorn or butternut squash, potatoes, or any root veggie. Each package seasons three batches of squash.
 
Asian Curry & Honey
Honey, cumin, red pepper, peppercorns, onions. Mix with olive oil then toss with carrots, potatoes, or any root veggie. Each package makes three batches of grilled veggies.
 
Sweet & Spicy Moroccan
Coriander, paprika, garlic, cumin, chili pepper. Mix rub with olive oil then toss with cubes of veggies and grill. Then toss with balsamic vinegar and orange zest to complete the exotic flavor. Each package seasons two batches of root veggies.
 
Dijon Pepper Vinaigrette
Steakhouse-inspired flavor of cracked pepper and vinegar: mustard, black pepper, dill seed, coriander, red peppers, chili peppers. Mix with olive oil, then brush over Portobello mushrooms or other hearty veggies and grill. Each package seasons three batches.
 
Spicy Peri Peri & Lemon
Grilling kale and other veggies with a kicked up, but balanced, spicy flavor is easy with this blend of chili pepper, lemon peel, and garlic. Each package seasons three batches.
 
But wait, there’s more!
 
Sweet & Tangy Pickling Spice
Pickling summer veggies like cucumbers, green beans and asparagus is easy with this pickling blend of coriander seed, mustard seed, cloves, peppercorns, celery seed and other spices. Just mix with vinegar and sugar; bring to a boil… add cut veggies and cool. You’ve got pickled veggies! Each package pickles one pound of cut veggies.
 
 
You won’t even recognize your vegetables once you grill them up with all of this amazing flavor! Don’t miss our grilling festival, which runs through Memorial Day. 

Everyone Will Eat Their Vegetables

We have all kinds of flavors for you to choose from!
 
Balsamic & Roasted Onion
A delicious blend of onions, balsamic, garlic, brown sugar, sea salt, and spices. Just mix with olive oil and melted butter, then toss with Brussels sprouts, potatoes, or any root veggie and grill. Each package makes three batches of grilled veggies.
 
Manchego & Roasted Garlic
Onion, garlic, natural manchego cheese flavor. Mix rub with olive oil and melted butter, then brush on cauliflower “steaks” or sliced potatoes. Each package seasons three batches of veggies.
 
Parmesan Mediterranean
Parmesan cheese, onion, garlic. Mix with olive oil and melted butter, and toss with thick slices of acorn or butternut squash, potatoes, or any root veggie. Each package seasons three batches of squash.
 
Asian Curry & Honey
Honey, cumin, red pepper, peppercorns, onions. Mix with olive oil then toss with carrots, potatoes, or any root veggie. Each package makes three batches of grilled veggies.
 
Sweet & Spicy Moroccan
Coriander, paprika, garlic, cumin, chili pepper. Mix rub with olive oil then toss with cubes of veggies and grill. Then toss with balsamic vinegar and orange zest to complete the exotic flavor. Each package seasons two batches of root veggies.
 
Dijon Pepper Vinaigrette
Steakhouse-inspired flavor of cracked pepper and vinegar: mustard, black pepper, dill seed, coriander, red peppers, chili peppers. Mix with olive oil, then brush over Portobello mushrooms or other hearty veggies and grill. Each package seasons three batches.
 
Spicy Peri Peri & Lemon
Grilling kale and other veggies with a kicked up, but balanced, spicy flavor is easy with this blend of chili pepper, lemon peel, and garlic. Each package seasons three batches.
 
But wait, there’s more!
 
Sweet & Tangy Pickling Spice
Pickling summer veggies like cucumbers, green beans and asparagus is easy with this pickling blend of coriander seed, mustard seed, cloves, peppercorns, celery seed and other spices. Just mix with vinegar and sugar; bring to a boil… add cut veggies and cool. You’ve got pickled veggies! Each package pickles one pound of cut veggies.
 
 
You won’t even recognize your vegetables once you grill them up with all of this amazing flavor! Don’t miss our grilling festival, which runs through Memorial Day. 

Rumi Spice: US Military Vets Connect Afghan Saffron Farmers with the World

When deployed in the region, the founders saw first-hand the challenges and opportunities facing the Afghan people. They knew strengthening the country’s greatest resource – its people – was the key to social and economic stability and peace. 
 
Rumi Spice focused on saffron because while most of the world’s saffron is grown in Iran, Afghanistan is in the same growing region, so it is a perfect climate to grow this treasured spice. 
 
Why does saffron have such a high value?
It takes a lot of work to harvest and process saffron. The flowers are taken from the field in the early morning as soon as they open and are transported to a farm house where the stigmas are separated from the blossoms. Stigmas are attached to the flowers by yellow filaments called styles and must be separated by hand. It takes 450,000 stigmas to make a kilogram of saffron. Each flower has 3 stigmas, so workers must process 150,000 blossoms to produce that amount
 
Meet the US veterans behind Rumi Spice

Kimberly Jung
Co-Founder and CEO, was a U.S. Army Engineer Officer who led a platoon in Wardak and Ghazni Provinces in 2010-2011 and served with provincial reconstruction teams. 
 
Keith Alaniz
Co-Founder and President, is a U.S. Army veteran who worked in Afghanistan from 2011 to 2014, is fluent in Afghan Farsi, and managed a large redevelopment project in Badakhshan Province.
 
Emily Miller
Co-Founder and COO, previously served as a U.S. Army Engineer Officer in Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom supporting Special Operations Forces in an effort to build rapport with the Afghan women and local communities. 
 
Carol Wang
Co-Founder and Legal Counsel, worked in Kabul from 2009-2011 where she focused on growing community enterprises and expanding their access to regional and international markets.

Next time you're in your Central Market, look for Rumi Spice Saffron and support these service women and men in their efforts to bring peace and stability to Afghan villages. 

All photos from "Army Vets' Rumi Spice Opens Saffron Pipeline from Afghanistan to Chicago" by Janet Rausa Fuller

Rumi Spice: US Military Vets Connect Afghan Saffron Farmers with the World

When deployed in the region, the founders saw first-hand the challenges and opportunities facing the Afghan people. They knew strengthening the country’s greatest resource – its people – was the key to social and economic stability and peace. 
 
Rumi Spice focused on saffron because while most of the world’s saffron is grown in Iran, Afghanistan is in the same growing region, so it is a perfect climate to grow this treasured spice. 
 
Why does saffron have such a high value?
It takes a lot of work to harvest and process saffron. The flowers are taken from the field in the early morning as soon as they open and are transported to a farm house where the stigmas are separated from the blossoms. Stigmas are attached to the flowers by yellow filaments called styles and must be separated by hand. It takes 450,000 stigmas to make a kilogram of saffron. Each flower has 3 stigmas, so workers must process 150,000 blossoms to produce that amount
 
Meet the US veterans behind Rumi Spice

Kimberly Jung
Co-Founder and CEO, was a U.S. Army Engineer Officer who led a platoon in Wardak and Ghazni Provinces in 2010-2011 and served with provincial reconstruction teams. 
 
Keith Alaniz
Co-Founder and President, is a U.S. Army veteran who worked in Afghanistan from 2011 to 2014, is fluent in Afghan Farsi, and managed a large redevelopment project in Badakhshan Province.
 
Emily Miller
Co-Founder and COO, previously served as a U.S. Army Engineer Officer in Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom supporting Special Operations Forces in an effort to build rapport with the Afghan women and local communities. 
 
Carol Wang
Co-Founder and Legal Counsel, worked in Kabul from 2009-2011 where she focused on growing community enterprises and expanding their access to regional and international markets.

Next time you're in your Central Market, look for Rumi Spice Saffron and support these service women and men in their efforts to bring peace and stability to Afghan villages. 

All photos from "Army Vets' Rumi Spice Opens Saffron Pipeline from Afghanistan to Chicago" by Janet Rausa Fuller

Rumi Spice: US Military Vets Connect Afghan Saffron Farmers with the World

When deployed in the region, the founders saw first-hand the challenges and opportunities facing the Afghan people. They knew strengthening the country’s greatest resource – its people – was the key to social and economic stability and peace. 
 
Rumi Spice focused on saffron because while most of the world’s saffron is grown in Iran, Afghanistan is in the same growing region, so it is a perfect climate to grow this treasured spice. 
 
Why does saffron have such a high value?
It takes a lot of work to harvest and process saffron. The flowers are taken from the field in the early morning as soon as they open and are transported to a farm house where the stigmas are separated from the blossoms. Stigmas are attached to the flowers by yellow filaments called styles and must be separated by hand. It takes 450,000 stigmas to make a kilogram of saffron. Each flower has 3 stigmas, so workers must process 150,000 blossoms to produce that amount
 
Meet the US veterans behind Rumi Spice

Kimberly Jung
Co-Founder and CEO, was a U.S. Army Engineer Officer who led a platoon in Wardak and Ghazni Provinces in 2010-2011 and served with provincial reconstruction teams. 
 
Keith Alaniz
Co-Founder and President, is a U.S. Army veteran who worked in Afghanistan from 2011 to 2014, is fluent in Afghan Farsi, and managed a large redevelopment project in Badakhshan Province.
 
Emily Miller
Co-Founder and COO, previously served as a U.S. Army Engineer Officer in Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom supporting Special Operations Forces in an effort to build rapport with the Afghan women and local communities. 
 
Carol Wang
Co-Founder and Legal Counsel, worked in Kabul from 2009-2011 where she focused on growing community enterprises and expanding their access to regional and international markets.

Next time you're in your Central Market, look for Rumi Spice Saffron and support these service women and men in their efforts to bring peace and stability to Afghan villages. 

All photos from "Army Vets' Rumi Spice Opens Saffron Pipeline from Afghanistan to Chicago" by Janet Rausa Fuller

Gulf Wild Seafood: Sustainable, Responsible, and In-store

A direct connection with the fishermen
Gulf Wild works directly with local fishermen dedicated to the integrity and sustainability of fisheries throughout the Gulf of Mexico. The fisheries maintain the highest standards for commercial fishing operations and seafood handling.  
 
What does the Gulf Wild tag mean?
Fish that carry the Gulf Wild brand set the standard for genuine, responsibly caught seafood harvested by local fishermen right on our doorstep in the Gulf of Mexico. When you see a Gulf Wild tag on fish at Central Market, you can be assured you’re getting fresh, responsibly harvested seafood straight from the Gulf.
 
Track your fish
Each Gulf Wild fish is tagged with a unique number. It acts sort of like a social security number designating each individual fish. Want to know where your fish came from? Input the tag number into the Gulf Wild TransparenSea web page or scan the QR codes, and you can access information for that specific fish, such where the fish came from, the boat it was caught on, and where it landed. It’s a way for you to confirm that the fish you purchased is authentic, domestically fished, responsibly caught and undeniably fresh.

Like what you hear? Come on in and see for yourself. Ask our Fish Mongers any questions you may have, and take home a Gulf Wild fish today!

Image Credit: Fast Company 

Gulf Wild Seafood: Sustainable, Responsible, and In-store

A direct connection with the fishermen
Gulf Wild works directly with local fishermen dedicated to the integrity and sustainability of fisheries throughout the Gulf of Mexico. The fisheries maintain the highest standards for commercial fishing operations and seafood handling.  
 
What does the Gulf Wild tag mean?
Fish that carry the Gulf Wild brand set the standard for genuine, responsibly caught seafood harvested by local fishermen right on our doorstep in the Gulf of Mexico. When you see a Gulf Wild tag on fish at Central Market, you can be assured you’re getting fresh, responsibly harvested seafood straight from the Gulf.
 
Track your fish
Each Gulf Wild fish is tagged with a unique number. It acts sort of like a social security number designating each individual fish. Want to know where your fish came from? Input the tag number into the Gulf Wild TransparenSea web page or scan the QR codes, and you can access information for that specific fish, such where the fish came from, the boat it was caught on, and where it landed. It’s a way for you to confirm that the fish you purchased is authentic, domestically fished, responsibly caught and undeniably fresh.

Like what you hear? Come on in and see for yourself. Ask our Fish Mongers any questions you may have, and take home a Gulf Wild fish today!

Image Credit: Fast Company