Citrus Pairings

Here are some of there best suggestions that take full advantage of the peak of season throughout our stores.

  • Chipotle Lime Marinated Sirloin paired with Martin House The Salty Lady Gose
  • Orange, Honey Habanero Marinated Sirloin paired with Navarro Lopez Old Vines Crianza
  • Lemon Bars paired with La Romantica Brachetto
  • Lemon Rosemary Rotisserie Chicken paired with Karbach Weisse Versa
  • Orange Basil Cold Press Juice paired with Domaine Gueneau Sancerre
  • Garlic, Basil, and Lemon Pesto Lamb Chop paired with Speri Valpolicella Ripasso
  • Orange, Honey Habanero Marinated Salmon Filet paired with Cross River Sauvignon Blanc
  • Chipotle Lime Marinated Salmon Filet paired with Nora Albariño
  • Citrus, Dill Salmon Seafood Burger paired with Saint Arnold Boiler Room Berliner Weiss
  • Just In Time Strawberry Lemon Squares paired with Hans Pfeiffer Auslese Riesling
  • Italian Bread with Agrumato Citrus Olive Oil paired with Settesoli Pinot Grigio
  • Chard, Kale, and Orange Salad paired with Matthew Fritz Sauvignon Blanc
  • Salmon with Spinach and Chipotle Orange Butter paired with Rauzan Despagne Bordeaux Blanc
  • Lemon Almond Butter Cake paired with Riondo Moscato d'Asti
  • Fresh Guacamole with Chips paired with Adelbert's Naked Nun
  • Lemon Herb Shrimp Seafood Burger paired with La Javeline Vouvray
  • Fresh Citrus Fruits paired with Galo's Famous Sangria!

You can find out more about all of these products in our Citrus Event Guide.

Cooking with Citrus and Virginia

After months of rich holiday food, come the new year, like most, I am always ready for something bright, clean, and fresh. This time of year that trifecta that means cooking with citrus, and Virginia's recipe for Spicy Chicken with Clementines seemed the perfect way to cook away the winter blahs. Inspired by Amelia Saltsman's The Seasonal Jewish Kitchen: A Fresh Take on Tradition, Virginia recommends assembling this dish in the morning so it can marinate all day and then pop it in the oven at the end of the day, serving it with whole grain couscous and a celery salad. Bright, clean, and fresh – along with healthy, easy, and most of all delicious – the best of weeknight cooking. 
 
Here is the recipe, for you fine folks:
6 boneless skinless chicken thighs
4 clementines, cut into the eighths
3 small onions, quartered
1/4 cup black olives
2 tablespoons harissa, or to taste (or in a pinch, you could use sriracha)
1 tablespoon agave syrup
Coarse kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
 
Combine the chicken, clementines, onions, olives, harissa, and agave in a sealable container. Season with salt and pepper. Refrigerate to marinate at least 30 minutes and up to 8 hours. (I quickly put it together in the morning and let it marinate all day while I am at work.)
 
Heat the oven to 350°F. Remove the chicken from the refrigerator and transfer to a shallow baking dish. Set aside for 10 or so minutes to take the chill off. Transfer to the heated oven and bake until the juices run clear when pierced with the tip of a knife and the temperature registers about 160° when tested with an instant read thermometer, about 20 minutes. Change the oven setting to broil and cook until slightly charred and blistered, about 5 minutes depending on the strength of your broiler.

If this has tempted your tastebuds, you can see her in person, in our Cooking Schools in March, class schedules will be released on February 1st.

Photo courtesy of Virginia Willis

Cooking with Citrus and Virginia

After months of rich holiday food, come the new year, like most, I am always ready for something bright, clean, and fresh. This time of year that trifecta that means cooking with citrus, and Virginia's recipe for Spicy Chicken with Clementines seemed the perfect way to cook away the winter blahs. Inspired by Amelia Saltsman's The Seasonal Jewish Kitchen: A Fresh Take on Tradition, Virginia recommends assembling this dish in the morning so it can marinate all day and then pop it in the oven at the end of the day, serving it with whole grain couscous and a celery salad. Bright, clean, and fresh – along with healthy, easy, and most of all delicious – the best of weeknight cooking. 
 
Here is the recipe, for you fine folks:
6 boneless skinless chicken thighs
4 clementines, cut into the eighths
3 small onions, quartered
1/4 cup black olives
2 tablespoons harissa, or to taste (or in a pinch, you could use sriracha)
1 tablespoon agave syrup
Coarse kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
 
Combine the chicken, clementines, onions, olives, harissa, and agave in a sealable container. Season with salt and pepper. Refrigerate to marinate at least 30 minutes and up to 8 hours. (I quickly put it together in the morning and let it marinate all day while I am at work.)
 
Heat the oven to 350°F. Remove the chicken from the refrigerator and transfer to a shallow baking dish. Set aside for 10 or so minutes to take the chill off. Transfer to the heated oven and bake until the juices run clear when pierced with the tip of a knife and the temperature registers about 160° when tested with an instant read thermometer, about 20 minutes. Change the oven setting to broil and cook until slightly charred and blistered, about 5 minutes depending on the strength of your broiler.

If this has tempted your tastebuds, you can see her in person, in our Cooking Schools in March, class schedules will be released on February 1st.

Photo courtesy of Virginia Willis

But Wait… There Are More Ways to Use It

Here is a list of DIY inspired projects for when you are ready to take a break from cooking your favorite citrus fruit:
  • Use leftover lemon rinds to clean your garbage disposal, by sending them down the drain with a few cubes of ice.
  • Alternately, throw juiced rinds into your dishwasher (yep, free floating, just toss ‘em in) and marvel at the brightened, spotless, residue-free dishes.
  • Add lemon juice to your laundry as a detergent-booster and brightener. You can also apply undiluted lemon juice to ink or rust stains, then wash the garment as normal. If you add salt to make a thick paste, it’ll work wonders on mildew stains.
  • Pure lemon juice can be used to polish copper. Lemon with a bit of salt will polish brass or stainless steel. Lemon sprinkled with cream of tartar will polish aluminum. All of these are great for cleaning a faucet (whatever metal it may be) and removing lime scale or hard water deposits.
  • Half a lemon and salt rubbed over your cutting board can be used to deodorize and sanitize.
  • Boil leftover fresh orange peels as a free and easy air-freshener.
  • Save your orange peels and air-dry them spread on paper or cloth towels. Then bind them up in little sachets, and throw one in each of your drawers. They smell great and they even help to keep critters away.
  • Add orange peels to your garbage to keep bugs away (especially useful in outdoor situations, such as camping).
  • A bit of orange peel in your brown sugar will keep it from getting hard and clumpy.
  • Dry grapefruit completely and then use it as kindling to start your fire. No, really! It’s effective and it smells great (orange works as well).
  • Cut a grapefruit in half and dip it in salt. Now you’re ready to scrub the tub!
  • Use a solution of grapefruit juice with vinegar to clean your non-wood floors.
  • Sprinkle citrus peels around your garden, to keep it from becoming the neighborhood litter box, kitties hate the smell. 
Now the only thing to do, is to wait for it to get warm enough outside for lemonade on the porch.

But Wait… There Are More Ways to Use It

Here is a list of DIY inspired projects for when you are ready to take a break from cooking your favorite citrus fruit:
  • Use leftover lemon rinds to clean your garbage disposal, by sending them down the drain with a few cubes of ice.
  • Alternately, throw juiced rinds into your dishwasher (yep, free floating, just toss ‘em in) and marvel at the brightened, spotless, residue-free dishes.
  • Add lemon juice to your laundry as a detergent-booster and brightener. You can also apply undiluted lemon juice to ink or rust stains, then wash the garment as normal. If you add salt to make a thick paste, it’ll work wonders on mildew stains.
  • Pure lemon juice can be used to polish copper. Lemon with a bit of salt will polish brass or stainless steel. Lemon sprinkled with cream of tartar will polish aluminum. All of these are great for cleaning a faucet (whatever metal it may be) and removing lime scale or hard water deposits.
  • Half a lemon and salt rubbed over your cutting board can be used to deodorize and sanitize.
  • Boil leftover fresh orange peels as a free and easy air-freshener.
  • Save your orange peels and air-dry them spread on paper or cloth towels. Then bind them up in little sachets, and throw one in each of your drawers. They smell great and they even help to keep critters away.
  • Add orange peels to your garbage to keep bugs away (especially useful in outdoor situations, such as camping).
  • A bit of orange peel in your brown sugar will keep it from getting hard and clumpy.
  • Dry grapefruit completely and then use it as kindling to start your fire. No, really! It’s effective and it smells great (orange works as well).
  • Cut a grapefruit in half and dip it in salt. Now you’re ready to scrub the tub!
  • Use a solution of grapefruit juice with vinegar to clean your non-wood floors.
  • Sprinkle citrus peels around your garden, to keep it from becoming the neighborhood litter box, kitties hate the smell. 
Now the only thing to do, is to wait for it to get warm enough outside for lemonade on the porch.

Meet the Finger Lime

With a taste that is best described as a cross between a lime and a lemon, with a burst of tartness, there are multiple ways of serving finger limes. The most head turning way is to slice off the top end and force out the citrus pearls as if you were squeezing a tube of toothpaste. Then how to eat them or accent dishes is totally up to you. The possibilities continue to come in daily, you can find people adding the citrus beads to martini's, beer, or even mojito's! Chefs have been utilizing them in all sorts of dishes, mixing it up in all types of fish or using the beads to put a final touch on fresh oysters.

And when I say the possibilities are endless I mean it, how about adding some zestyness to a salad or infusing them into a guacamole dip, topping some tacos, and presenting with some sushi. Finger limes are usually available through February, and you can find them here at Central Market currently coinciding with Citrus Fest.

Meet the Finger Lime

With a taste that is best described as a cross between a lime and a lemon, with a burst of tartness, there are multiple ways of serving finger limes. The most head turning way is to slice off the top end and force out the citrus pearls as if you were squeezing a tube of toothpaste. Then how to eat them or accent dishes is totally up to you. The possibilities continue to come in daily, you can find people adding the citrus beads to martini's, beer, or even mojito's! Chefs have been utilizing them in all sorts of dishes, mixing it up in all types of fish or using the beads to put a final touch on fresh oysters.

And when I say the possibilities are endless I mean it, how about adding some zestyness to a salad or infusing them into a guacamole dip, topping some tacos, and presenting with some sushi. Finger limes are usually available through February, and you can find them here at Central Market currently coinciding with Citrus Fest.

Fresh Juice Is Just The Beginning

This time of year is full of bold oranges, bright yellows, glowing greens, and vibrant reds to brighten the winter palette. The array of citrus fruits available can be a bit mind blowing, so to move you beyond lemons wedges and fresh orange juice, here are some sure-fire, tastebud approved ideas that will have your culinary juices flowing in no time.

For a light starter, try a Blood Orange, Red Onion and Fennel salad that incorporates classic Mediterranean flavors with a native fruit

Citrus Ginger Compound Butter is the perfect topper for a seared or grilled salmon. Simply combine 1 1/2 teaspoon fresh lemon juice, 1 1/2 teaspoon orange juice, 6 tablespoon butter (softened), 1 green onion (minced), 2 tbsp fresh ginger root (minced) and mix well. Then top finished salmon with a pat of the compound butter.

Citrus-infused sugar can be made from a variety of citrus fruits like Meyer Lemon, Heirloom Navels, or Kaffir limes to name a few. Cut lengthwise strips of zest from fruit. Trim white pith. Bury strips in a large Mason jar of granulated sugar. Store airtight in a dark place for 2 weeks before opening. Use sugar in whipped cream, yogurt, or cakes.  

One of my favorite winter treats growing up was when my mom would make Grapefruit Brûlée, and it is so easy it is one that I now recreate regularly.  Pre-heat your broiler, then cut the grapefruit in half, then trim just enough off the bottom that the halves sit level on a sheet pan. Pat grapefruit flesh dry with a paper towel, then sprinkle about 1 tablespoon of sugar on each half. Place under broiler, watching they don't burn, but that all the sugar is melted in about 5-8 minutes. Cool slightly before serving.

Another great idea, try a little grapefruit sorbet in your Champagne or Prosecco for an appetizing aperitif. 

You can also try Scallop Ceviche with Candied CitrusLemon Sorbet With Blueberry Red Wine SauceGinger Lemon Nectarine Muffins, or any of the sweet and savory citrus recipes available.

New Year, New Lunch

So this year, I have made a resolution to bring something homemade and delicious for lunch at least three times a week. And after falling down a worm hole of food blogs, here are some of my tips and tricks to make this year's resolution stick.

Sunday prep – Putting together an interesting and satisfying lunch can feel daunting at 7:15 on Tuesday morning. This is where a bit of prep work is key. Here are few go-to’s to make grabbing your lunch a bit easier. 

  • Make a pot of medium or hard boiled eggs (really your preference). They are perfect for topping a salad, adding a bit of protein to a sandwich, or being a filling part of my favorite lunch, the snack lunch. For me that’s a bit of hummus, pita, nuts, a piece of fruit, an egg, and a square of dark chocolate. 
  • Pre-wash and clean your greens. It makes throwing a salad together super easy and quick.
  • Cook a few servings of grains (rice, farro, bulgar, quinoa, or whatever you find interesting and tasty) and / or beans (the rainbow can be your guide here). They make the perfect side dish to a leftover protein, and are a great way to jazz up a salad.
  • Cut and portion melon and berries. I find the only way I eat melon or strawberries is if I clean and cut them when I get home from the store , then put them in individually portioned containers. Talk about easy choice to grab in the morning.

Greens and grains – I mentioned both of these items in the prep work above, but I find having clean salad greens and a mix of already cooked grains or beans, means I feel good about what I am throwing into my lunch bag. And, well, they're already done. It took me a while before I considered mixing them together (with or without a bit of additional protein or cheese), but now that I have, I think there is no going back. 

Soup – Simply put making one pot of soup, means you have easily just made 4-8 meals depending on the recipe and your appetite. The hard work is done at this point, from here all you need to do is portion and drop them in your fridge or freezer. Make the soup a side to a sandwich or salad, or make it your whole meal, totally up to you, but here are a few great lists to get your creative juices flowing:

Rethink your sandwich – Leftovers from dinner can always be a sandwich the next day. Almost any protein you cooked for dinner can take the place of cold cuts. If you roasted a chicken, pull the meat off the bone to make a pulled chicken sandwich, use grilled fish as the base for a niçoise-inspired sandwich (especially if you have eggs cooked and greens ready), or slather bread with chimichurri and stick sliced steak between it, I promise it is better than reheating it.

The power of an avocado – After a trip to LA when every restaurant had their own version of avocado toast on the menu, I started to rethink how and when I was eating this green goody. They are really versatile, chock full of nutrients, travel well, and I find them to be satisfying and filling. Adding avocado to or as the base of a sandwich and salad is a lunch no brainer, and an easy replacement for meat. Here are some fun recipe ideas.

Alright 2016, three lunches down, 150-some to go.

Get the Skinny on Everything From A to Zinc

And, once our week long sale ends, you have one more chance to save 25% during our in-store Health Fairs where you can learn more about your favorite Healthy Living products. 

Health Fair Schedule:
Austin Westgate and Dallas Lovers LaneJanuary 9th, 11:00am – 3:00pm
San Antonio and SouthlakeJanuary 16th, 11:00am – 3:00pm
Austin North Lamar and PlanoJanuary 23rd, 11:00am – 3:00pm
Houston and Fort WorthJanuary 30th, 11:00am – 3:00pm

Also check out this month's Healthy Living, Natural Savings online or in-store for ideas on small steps that can lead to big changes. Tips include new ways to energize if you are struggling with fatigue, and how to get a restful nights sleep. As well as, the incredible immune-boosting effects of herbs and probiotics, changing your mood with scents, and fighting lacklaster winter skin.

From all of at Central Market, we wish you and yours a Happy New Year.