The Chocolate Biscuit Cake Returns to Central Market Fort Worth

It’s been a year since the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, and the international interest in this charming couple hasn’t waned a bit. So we decided to bring back Prince William’s favorite cake, made with McVities rich tea biscuits and dark chocolate. Buckingham Palace sent the recipe to the chefs at McVities, famed producer of British digestives, who made a version comprising 1,700 biscuits and nearly 40 pounds of chocolate for the wedding that took place on April 29, 2011.
 
Paul Courtney, McVitie’s cake design and development head chef, said he was proud to have the task of making it for William. “It has a couple of secret ingredients we can’t tell you about, but it will have dark chocolate, to give it a really nice flavor, and we will use rich tea biscuits that will be broken up. It will be decorated with chocolate display work, which will be contemporary, modern, and elegant. When Prince William was a young boy, he would have it for tea and really enjoyed it.”
 
Traditionally the recipe consists of rich tea biscuits (cookies) crushed in a bowl with glazed cherries and raisins. Margarine, condensed milk, and dark chocolate are melted together and folded into the biscuit mixture, which is then poured into a tin lined with parchment paper. This is frozen until needed, then allowed to set at room temperature for 2 hours. More chocolate enrobes the cake, which is then cut and served to guests.
 
Central Market’s version is the perfect size for two—or one, if you dare.
 

The Chocolate Biscuit Cake Returns to Central Market Fort Worth

It’s been a year since the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, and the international interest in this charming couple hasn’t waned a bit. So we decided to bring back Prince William’s favorite cake, made with McVities rich tea biscuits and dark chocolate. Buckingham Palace sent the recipe to the chefs at McVities, famed producer of British digestives, who made a version comprising 1,700 biscuits and nearly 40 pounds of chocolate for the wedding that took place on April 29, 2011.
 
Paul Courtney, McVitie’s cake design and development head chef, said he was proud to have the task of making it for William. “It has a couple of secret ingredients we can’t tell you about, but it will have dark chocolate, to give it a really nice flavor, and we will use rich tea biscuits that will be broken up. It will be decorated with chocolate display work, which will be contemporary, modern, and elegant. When Prince William was a young boy, he would have it for tea and really enjoyed it.”
 
Traditionally the recipe consists of rich tea biscuits (cookies) crushed in a bowl with glazed cherries and raisins. Margarine, condensed milk, and dark chocolate are melted together and folded into the biscuit mixture, which is then poured into a tin lined with parchment paper. This is frozen until needed, then allowed to set at room temperature for 2 hours. More chocolate enrobes the cake, which is then cut and served to guests.
 
Central Market’s version is the perfect size for two—or one, if you dare.
 

Clos Clementine 2011: Rose From Provence

Wine 101: All rosé is not sweet.

Why to buy: With spring in the air, we’re stocking up on affordable weekend party wines to pair with the lamb chops with herbs de Provence, whole fish, and asparagus we’ve got on the grill.

The back story: This dry, aromatic rosé from Côtes de Provence – that scenic region of the French riviera’s Cote d'Azur stretching from Marseille to Nice – is handcrafted by three wine-making partners who were frustrated with the difficulty in finding high-quality table wines at reasonable prices in the US.

Nose, palate, and pairing: Bone dry with hints of strawberry and citrus on the palate, we love this wine with the seafood traditional to the French Riviera – whole roasted fish, briney tuna niçoise salad, and bouillabaisse.

Appellation: Côtes de Provence
Grapes: 30% Grenache, 30% Cinsault, 30% Tibouren, 10% Syrah
Alcohol: 13%
Method of Production: 100% stainless steel aging
Terroir: 35-year-old Southern-facing vines in stony calcified clay

Our New French Favorites

Pain Meunier
Pain meunier, or “miller’s bread,” was originally developed to honor the farmers and millers who produced the flour for the bakers who made the bread for the village. It’s made with all the components of the wheat kernel (white flour, whole wheat flour, wheat germ, and cracked wheat), giving this hearty, nutritional bread a rich, complex flavor. Find it fresh in our Bakery.

Château Paradis Rosé
Find a porch, uncork a bottle, and sip while you watch the sun set. This refreshing rosé is a delicate, crisp wine that’s made for summer. Recognized for the soft pink color, this unusual blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Grenache, and Sauvignon Blanc has flavors of red berries and citrus.
 
La Mère Poulard Cookies
These traditional, delicate cookies are made using the original recipe of their creator, La Mère Poulard. Only high-quality, local ingredients from Normandy are used to create gourmet flavors such as double chocolate, vanilla, and caramel. Taste a bit of French culture in every bite of these biscuits. Look for them in our Grocery aisles.

Crêpes
Look for crêpes, France’s favorite street food, in our Chef’s Case, including sucrée (sweet) and salée (savory). Choose foodie flavors like ham and Gruyère, mushroom, rotisserie chicken, herbes de Provence and goat cheese, or three cheese and spinach.

Andresy Preserves
You’ll find these preserves on French breakfast tables, served alongside freshly baked croissants. Founded in 1950, the company still uses copper cauldrons to cook the preserves in small batches, making quality a top priority. Choose peach vanilla, morello cherry, or wild strawberry and fig.
 
Apidis Honey
The Perronneau family has been in the beekeeping business since 1890. The largest honey producer in France has 4,500 active bee hives, churning out more than 30 mono-floral varieties, including wild lavender from Provence, which is a lovely complement to baked goods; acacia from Cote d’Or, which can be used in soups, curries, omelets, and stir frys; spring flowers from Cotes d’Armor, which can be used as a glaze or mixed into sauces; or forest from Vosges, which is used to flavor beverages or as a sweet topper to ice cream, yogurt, and cottage cheese.
 
Creperolles Cheese Crackers
These are, in a word, addictive. In France, these buttery, bite-size crackers are commonly served with cocktails before dinner. They have just the right amount of sharpness, compliments of the cheese filling. A must-have for your next dinner party.

Les Anis de Flavigny
It is believed that the recipe for these anise seed mints was developed by monks in a Benedictine abbey in a small picturesque village in Burgundy. Since 1591, they have been made with the same recipe and packaged in collectible tins featuring equally picturesque love scenes. Pick up your love story in our store, in the Bulk & Candy department.

Henriot Brut Souverain
This dry, rich Champagne comes from the renowned family-owned and -operated House of Henriot, a name synonymous with fine sparkling wine. A blend of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir creates bright flavors of green apple with a hint of apricots. Don’t save this bubbly for a special occasion. Enjoy it any day of the week.
 
30-Month Comté
Selected especially for Passport France, this classic French cheese is made according to strict regulations to be called Comté. The milk comes from Montbéliarde cows native to the region, and each animal has a minimum of 2.5 acres of natural pasture to graze. This carefully aged cheese has a complex flavor profile of walnuts, hazelnuts, roasted peanuts, mushrooms, garlic, honey, and matured cream. The creamy texture is dotted with small, crunchy white crystals characteristic of a more aged Comté. This is one cheese not to be missed.
 
Quiche
Calling all real men. Our chefs are preparing new flavors of this flaky-crusted, open-faced French staple. Try egg white tomato asparagus, tomato olive tapenade, bacon mushroom leek, or traditional quiche Lorraine. They’re all freshly prepared and ready to be devoured. Look for them in our Chef’s Case.
 
Château d’Estoublon Extra Virgin Olive Oil
Olive oil never tasted – or looked – so elegant. Although less than 1% of the world’s olive oil comes from France, it is considered some of the finest. This one, packaged in a unique spray bottle, is made from handpicked olives that are cold pressed, filtered, and conserved in stainless-steel tanks in a controlled temperature chamber. Find it in our Grocery department.
 
Gibassier
This buttery pastry bread originating from the Luberon mountain range in Provence is flavored with anise seed, candied orange peel, and orange flower water, giving it a unique aroma as well as taste. Traditionally a sweet breakfast bread, it can be snacked on any time of day. And now it can be found hot from our Central Market ovens.
 
Bonne Maman Tarte Tatin
Bonne Maman is a classic household name for jams, cookies, and quintessential French desserts such as tarte tatin. Prepared using recipes that have been passed down through generations, these desserts, procured especially for Passport France, will go from our freezer shelves straight to your heart. And you can find them only at Central Market.
 

World-Renowned Chefs and Winemakers Visit Central Market for Passport France

For that reason, we’re bringing in the world’s leading experts on French wine and food. They’ll simplify French cooking and demystify French wines. From cooking classes and winemaker dinners to demonstrations and bottle signings, you won’t want to miss the chance to rub elbows with one of these French culinary experts—without spilling your wine.

ANNE WILLAN
Discover the Food and Wine of France
Dallas Lovers (5/18) and Houston (5/19)
Anne Willan, cookbook author and recipient of countless culinary honors, has been a driving force in the cooking world for decades. Her La Varenne cooking school in Burgundy was long regarded as one of the best in the world. She shares her love affair with French cooking for just two engagements during Passport France.
 
BRUNO DAVAILLON
Regional French Favorites: The Loire Valley
Southlake (5/15) and Dallas Lovers (5/16)
Bruno Davaillon, a 2012 James Beard award nominee for Best Chef Southwest, grew up on a farm in France’s Loire Valley. He spent five years as executive chef at Mix in Las Vegas, where he earned a Michelin star in 2008 and 2009. He then came to Dallas to be the executive chef at the Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek. His class for Central Market cooking schools, My French Favorites, is a treat.
 
PATRICE OLIVON
A Taste of Provence, Regional French Favorites: South of France
Dallas Lovers (5/8), Houston (5/10), San Antonio (5/11), Fort Worth (5/12), and Plano (5/13)
A graduate of the famed Ecole Hôtelière de Marseille, Patrice Olivon has cooked in kitchens from Nice to the White House. A winner of Food Fight and Iron Chef America on the Food Network, Olivon charms students into cooking while they marvel at his speed with knives, flames, and many ingredients.
 
THOMAS HENRIOT
Begin With a Bit of Bubbly
Houston (5/9), Austin North Lamar (5/10), Fort Worth (5/11), and Dallas Lovers (5/12)
Thomas Henriot’s family has been in Champagne since the 16th century. Henriot now represents all four of Maisons et Domaines Henriot’s prestigious estates: Bouchard Père et Fils, William Fèvre, Villa Ponciago, and Champagne Henriot. Experience one of the world’s more coveted Champagnes and learn from a master about its creation and long history in France.
 
LAURENT DROUHIN
Biodynamic Wines of Burgundy
Dallas Lovers (5/14), Fort Worth (5/15), and Houston (5/16)
For the last 130 years, Maison Joseph Drouhin has offered an intriguing array of Burgundy wines, recognized for their great purity and taste. With a total of 182 acres, it is one of the largest estates in the region. Laurent Drouhin, grandson of Joseph, recalls roller skating in the cellars and trailing his father into the vineyards at a young age. One of four grandchildren carrying on the Maison Joseph Drouhin legacy, Laurent shares his wines and the family’s continuing pursuit of natural elegance.
 
ANNE TRIMBACH
Fort Worth (5/20)
Trimbach has been dedicated to creating exceptional Alsace wines since 1626. The eldest of the 13th generation – that’s right, 13 generations – Anne Trimbach joined the family business upon graduation from business school. She is now Trimach’s brand ambassador, committed to communicating the celebrated Trimbach styles to customers around the globe. Have a bottle signed while chatting with Anne as she shares the Trimbach story.

Central Market Introduces New Scratch-Made Breads and Pastries for Passport France

At a time when most retailers are outsourcing their bakery operations, Central Market is more committed than ever to the craft of baking bread. In preparation for Passport France, our artisan bakers spent weeks training and reconnecting with their craft. Special teams studied in France, while others worked with masters in the kitchens at the Culinary Institute of America in California. The results are made-from-scratch breads and pastries as fine as any you’ll find in France, from dense miche to decorative pain marguerite to buttery kouign amann.
 
Look for these breads and pastries, pulled fresh from our ovens daily, during Passport France:
 
Zigzag Vivarais
This decorative bread, made with a blend of rye and wheat flour, is accented with a “zigzag” rolled or cut into the top.
 
Pain Marguerite
“Marguerite” is French for “daisy,” and this pull-apart bread lives up to its name. The daisy-shaped loaf is almost too pretty to eat. Almost.
 
Fougasse
A bit like Italian focaccia, fougasse is traditionally baked on the hearth of the bread oven after the coals have been swept out. Holes are cut throughout to maximize crust. Available in rosemary, lardons (bacon), and Comté.
 
Pain de Mie
“Mie” is French for “crumb.” Made in enclosed Pullman pans to prevent a crust from forming, this bread is just right for sandwiches or toasted points.
 
Pogne de Romans
A rich dough flavored with orange blossom water and shaped into a crown. During the Middle Ages, it was traditionally served at Easter, but you can find it at Central Market daily.
 
Miche
A four-pound loaf of bread is anything but ordinary. Made from high-extraction wheat flour, this bread was popular in France prior to the introduction of the baguette, and it was made popular by Lionel Poilane, the namesake of boulangerie Poilane.
 
Pain Meunier
This hearty, nutritional bread has a rich, complex flavor because it’s made with all the components of the wheat kernel.
 
Couronne Bordelaise
“Couronne” means “crown” in French, and this beautiful Bordeaux-style bread is, indeed, shaped like one.
 
Épi
A classic and common artisan loaf, this baguette is cut to look like a stalk of wheat.
 
Pain d’Aix
From the region of Aix in Provence, it’s shaped like a bow to reflect the dress code of the University of Aix en Provence.

Rustic Baguette
This baguette has a dusting of “cake” on top, which is indicative of longer, slower fermentation. It has a longer shelf life than the basic French baguette.
 
Subröt
German for “bread for a penny,” this small, slightly sour loaf from Alsace-Lorraine reflects the historical Germanic influences in the region.
 
Pain Brié
Traditionally from Normandy, this very dense bread is usually served with seafood.
 
Brioche Vendéenne
The most renowned French brioche comes from the western area of Vendee, south of the Loire River. It has just a hint of orange blossom water.
 
Baguette Viennoise
Austrian-style bread enriched with eggs and butter that was brought to Paris around 1840. Eaten for breakfast and also used as a decorative bread in bakery windows.
 
Kouign Amann
An extremely buttery, traditional cake from Brittany that originated around 1860, when flour was scarce and butter abundant. You'll never look at breakfast pastry the same way again.
 
Gibassier
This buttery pastry bread originating in Provence is flavored with anise seed, candied orange peel, and orange flower water, giving it a unique aroma as well as taste.
 
Cannelé Bordelais
This specialty pastry from Bordeaux has a tender custard center and thick, caramelized crust. Choose traditional or chocolate.

My Favorite Foods for Passport France: Rex H.

Consider Maison Bruyère, handcrafted, artisanal biscuits made by the Bruyère family since 1964. The company was founded by the father of the two sisters currently at the helm. These treats are made with egg white and almond, which results in a delightfully light and crisp cookie. The French love their afternoon tea as much if not more than the British, and these are the perfect complement to tea. Should you have any left over by evening, these are wonderful with ice cream or custard. Choose from orange, hazelnut, citron, and, of course, almond.
 
While we are on the subject of evening treats, what could be more French than Champagne? How about Champagne paired with Fossier Rose biscuits (pictured)? These cookies—more like ladyfingers, really—have been around since 1845. Dip these crunchy treats into your Champagne as they do in Rheims, or just enjoy them with tea or ice cream. If I have more than three, I start to talk like Maurice Chevalier.
 
Fossier also makes a “sand cookie,” as they are called in the Champagne region. This Champagne-flavored, shortbread-like cookie is shaped like a Champagne cork. So pop a cork and eat a cork. I feel that accent coming out again. 

Now let’s walk over to the beverage aisle for a glass of Rieme Limonade, refreshing and flavorful sparkling beverages from the South of France. Packaged in old-fashioned bale-top bottles, these sparkling lemonades, flavored with natural citrus oils and juice, are made from a recipe dating back to 1921.
 
You could also try to make a juice drink of your own, starting with Badoit sparkling water from Saint Galmier in central France, which is served in the finest French restaurants and cafes. Many in France mix this sparkling water with fruit nectars or juices for a sparkling fruit drink instead of soda. I like the Badoit just as it is—or shall I say “au naturel?” This water flows from a granite fissure some 500 meters deep and emerges naturally sparkling with a measure of fluoride and sodium bicarbonate.
 
Let’s push our shopping cart over to the condiment aisle for a look and taste of Edmond Fallot mustards from Burgundy. Fallot has been making traditional mustards in the time-honored fashion since 1840. Using stone mills for grinding the seed, extra care is taken to see that the mustard seed paste retains its full flavor. Take a taste from the sampling display, and you will note its robust pungency; this is mustard as it should be.
 
There are 10 flavors to choose from, including jars, crocks, and decorative pails. The pricing is exceptional, as are the flavors: black currant, green peppercorn (try a smear on beef tenderloin), honey balsamic, gingerbread, tarragon, and more. I have been known to use these mustards in place of ketchup with my fries, and I like to keep a jar on hand to top everything from chicken breasts and pork chops to fillets of fish. The black currant on salmon is one of my favorites.
                              
Look also for Plantin truffle mustard and truffle mayonnaise. The marriage of truffle and these condiments results in a synergy of flavor greater than the sum of its parts. Of course you can dress up a burger, but I like to use these two flavor-packed condiments on sandwiches, in salad dressings, or with hot or cold meats and seafood.
 
While we are thinking of salads, there is another brand of vinegar to mention. Melfor vinegar, from Alsace, has been a pantry basic in eight out of 10 homes in France. It is a secret blend of vinegar, honey, and herbal infusion. There are three flavors, and each makes a superb vinaigrette. Others who are counting calories find the vinegar flavorful enough on its own for a fat-free dressing. Melfor vinegar also can be used for deglazing your pan after sautéing fish, chicken, or pork.  
 
These are just a few of the items brought in for Passport France. I encourage you try them all—and more. Bon apetit!

Celebrate L�art de Vivre at Passport France May 9-22

If the answer’s oui, then join us for Passport France May 9-22, our third annual festival dedicated to the foods and culture of one of the world’s hottest culinary destinations. Expect an authentic French patisserie, charcuterie, fromagerie, and winery under one roof. We’re stocking the aisles with the best French foods we could find, including La Mère Poulard cookies, Comte aged 30 months, Petit Montebourg fresh cheese, Fallot Dijon, Le Palais des Thes, dozens of new wines such as Henriot Brut Souverain, and so much more. We’re also introducing 20 scratch-made breads in our Bakery, from hearty pain meunier to buttery kougin amann.

Plus there will be classes in our cooking school taught by French masters like Anne Willan of La Varenne and Patrice Olivon of PBS and Iron Chef fame. Or join us for tastings hosted by French winemakers, some part of multigenerational winemaking families. Ever played pétanque? Well, we can teach you how prior to the tournaments being held at many of our stores. And, naturally, we are making fresh crêpes salees and crêpes sucrees, everyone's favorite French street food.

If French cuisine is your scene, then don’t miss Passport France.

Kick Off Passport France at Le Tour de Fort Worth May 9

Come to Central Market Fort Worth before the ride begins at 5:30 pm to register and receive a wristband. You'll work up an appetite as you wind through Fort Worth's scenic neighborhoods and end the race at 7:30 pm back at CM Fort Worth for the kickoff of Passport France, our two-week celebration of French food and culture.
 
Satisfy your craving for French fare with loaded crêpes, baguette sandwiches, beer, and wine—all for only $1 each when you show your wristband. You can also get your photo snapped with the mayor while enjoying live music. Proceeds benefit Fort Worth charity Healthy Babies • Healthy Moms • Healthy Community.
 
But you don’t have to ride to party. Starting at 7 pm, everyone is welcome to enjoy regularly priced drinks and French specialties. Need more info? You can find it here, or contact the mayor's assistant, Keome Rowe, at 817-392-6121 or keome.rowe@fortworthtexas.gov.

Houston Only: Save Up To 25% On All Wine April 20-24

Here’s a breakdown of the savings:

  • 15% off 6-11 bottles
  • 20% off 12-17 bottles
  • 25% off 18 bottles or more

So whether it’s Oregon Pinots, Napa Cabs, Argentine Malbecs, or French Burgundies, now is the time to try new wines, buy old favorites, and pour some new life into your glass. This offer is good April 20-24 at Central Market Houston only.