Hak�s BBQ Sauce Debuts at Central Market for Thrill of the Grill

He soon realized that the food he made brought everyone together at the dinner table. “Every time I threw some garlic into a pan, someone appeared in the kitchen,” he says.
 
Although his first career choice was finance, Hakman continued to whip up delicious dishes for friends and family, and Sunday barbecues were the norm. Shortly after his son was born, Hakman made the decision to open a restaurant, but those plans were thwarted when he got an opportunity to appear on Fox’s MasterChef, a reality show in search of America’s best amateur cook.
 
Hakman’s BBQ sauce, used in two successful team challenges, stole the spot­light. Encouraged by feedback by host and culinary critic Gordon Ramsey, Hakman knew he had a hit on his hands and turned his focus to creating his own line of BBQ sauces.
 
He describes his creation as a “gentle­men’s sauce” – refined yet masculine. And now it’s available at Central Market, as we celebrate our annual Thrill of the Grill. Want to try it out? Below are Hakman’s serving suggestions. Or try his recipes for the ultimate backyard burger and chipotle bourbon ribs.
 
Serving Suggestions

  • Serve a generous pour on top of any type of burger
  • Use a glaze for ribs while they’re on the grill
  • Use as a side sauce for any cut of steak
  • Use on a pizza instead of tomato sauce
  • Use in a braise, chili, or as a salad dressing
  • Use as a dipping sauce with fresh vegetables, grilled or raw
  • Pour over a soft cheese – such as Brie or cream cheese – and serve with crackers

 

Hak�s BBQ Sauce Debuts at Central Market for Thrill of the Grill

He soon realized that the food he made brought everyone together at the dinner table. “Every time I threw some garlic into a pan, someone appeared in the kitchen,” he says.
 
Although his first career choice was finance, Hakman continued to whip up delicious dishes for friends and family, and Sunday barbecues were the norm. Shortly after his son was born, Hakman made the decision to open a restaurant, but those plans were thwarted when he got an opportunity to appear on Fox’s MasterChef, a reality show in search of America’s best amateur cook.
 
Hakman’s BBQ sauce, used in two successful team challenges, stole the spot­light. Encouraged by feedback by host and culinary critic Gordon Ramsey, Hakman knew he had a hit on his hands and turned his focus to creating his own line of BBQ sauces.
 
He describes his creation as a “gentle­men’s sauce” – refined yet masculine. And now it’s available at Central Market, as we celebrate our annual Thrill of the Grill. Want to try it out? Below are Hakman’s serving suggestions. Or try his recipes for the ultimate backyard burger and chipotle bourbon ribs.
 
Serving Suggestions

  • Serve a generous pour on top of any type of burger
  • Use a glaze for ribs while they’re on the grill
  • Use as a side sauce for any cut of steak
  • Use on a pizza instead of tomato sauce
  • Use in a braise, chili, or as a salad dressing
  • Use as a dipping sauce with fresh vegetables, grilled or raw
  • Pour over a soft cheese – such as Brie or cream cheese – and serve with crackers

 

Featured Cooking Classes for Thrill of the Grill

Entice With Spice: Indian Grilling With Shubhra Ramineni
Dallas Lovers, San Antonio, Austin North Lamar, Houston
Learn simple techniques that result in authentic Indian flavors from the grill. Ramineni (pictured), a local author and Indian food expert, shows you how to re-create easy-to-make versions of popular Indian dishes:

  • Pepper shrimp on a stick with mint chutney
  • Restaurant-style tandoori chicken
  • Fire-roasted eggplant
  • Fragrant basmati rice with cumin and peas
  • Raita (tomatoes, onions and cucumber spiced yogurt)
  • Kulfi (classic Indian ice cream with crushed pistachios)

 
Wines of Rioja With Foods From the Grill   
Austin North Lamar, Houston, Dallas Lovers, Fort Worth, San Antonio
Expert James King teaches you about what makes the Rioja region unique in terms of soil, climate, and grapes, all of which contribute to the diversity in style and flavors. Then on to a discussion of the basics of age classification (and why that is important to you when selecting wines) and a tasting that includes food pairings with an emphasis on delicious, small plates from the grill:

  • Fresh goat cheese with Muga Rosado
  • Manchego with Bodegas Bilbainas Viña Pomal Crianza
  • Southern-spiced grilled fish with Cuñe Viña Real Crianza
  • Grilled Spanish-style chorizo with Riscal Reserva
  • Barbecued beef brisket with Muga Unfiltered Reserva
  • Grilled venison with Marques De Caceres Gran Reserva  

Grilling Wild Game
Dallas Lovers, Fort Worth, San Antonio, Houston, Plano, Southlake
Join the cooking school staff for an evening of grill the game our great state has to offer. A representative from Texas Parks and Wildlife is on hand to discuss game management, hunting, and enjoying the great outdoors. Discover the importance of prep work and then gather ‘round the grill to prepare:

  • Wild boar chops with chipotle BBQ sauce
  • Texas quail in a bright marinade            
  • Bacon-wrapped venison backstrap
  • Fire-roasted new potato salad
  • Dutch oven apple pie with ice cream

A Quick Guide to Fresh Herbs

Basil
Tomato sauce and pesto come to mind for most people, but basil is the most versatile herb of all. It has a rich, slightly peppery flavor of mint and cloves, and it’s delicious raw or cooked.
 
Basil makes a sensational garnish and comes in many different flavors, such as Thai (anise) and opal basil. It’s the no. 1 herb for salads, stews, marinades—or just about anything. Never store basil at a temperature below 50 degrees or it will turn black. Blanch basil in boiling water for three to five seconds to retain the nice color when making pesto.
 
Chives
Chives are a member of the onion family. They are usually chopped fine and sprinkled on top of many foods, from baked potatoes to vichyssoise. Chives can be used whenever raw onion is called for, especially in delicate recipes that could be overpowered by the onion flavor.
 
Chives are wonderful in omelets, soups, salads and vegetables and should be added at the last minute of cooking. Use them as decorative garnish or as you would string to tie together veggies, cheeses or asparagus. Combine chunks of cucumber, tomato, feta cheese, minced chives and a splash of olive oil for a tasty peasant-style salad.
 
Dill
Dill is a member of the parsley family and a distant cousin to the carrot. It is best known for its flavor because the “crown” is used in pickling. Dill “weed” are the leaves, which are used in a variety of ways—but should not be used with a heavy hand.
 
Use scissors instead of a knife when mincing to preserve the flavor. Use it raw or add at the end of cooking because heat diminishes the flavor. Mix dill with butter, cream cheese, cottage cheese or yogurt to make a spread or dip. Add fresh dill to your favorite potato salad recipe. Combine dill with lemon butter on broiled fish.
 
Lemon Grass
This tropical perennial with grass-like leaves is 4 to 6 feet tall and exudes a lemon aroma when rubbed between the fingers. The grassy leaves may be steeped in hot water to make a hot lemon drink, and they are also used in flavoring fish stocks or curries, but they should be removed before serving. The lower stalk is the most important part of the herb, because it’s where the flavor is concentrated.
 
The lower stalk can be peeled, finely chopped or pounded to release its flavor for stir-fry dishes, fish or poultry sauces. It is used extensively in Thai, Vietnamese and other Asian dishes. 

Marjoram
Marjoram is a mild, fragrant herb and a close kin to oregano, although its flavor is subtler and sweeter. Marjoram is an important seasoning for sausage or for scenting lamb before cooking. Add marjoram to your favorite soup, stew, salad or omelet recipe, or use it as a substitute for oregano in pizza and lasagna recipes. Try it sprinkled over roasted veggies too.
 
Mint
Mint comes in a variety of flavors such as peppermint, apple mint, orange mint, lemon mint and chocolate mint, but the no. 1 seller is spearmint. It’s an important flavoring in Middle Eastern, Indian and Asian cuisines and in dishes featuring fatty cuts of lamb and pork.
 
Mint is famous in the South for cool mint juleps, and a spring of mint in tea or water makes a refreshing drink on hot summer days. You can also add mint to your favorite fruit salad or green salad recipes, and mint makes a lovely garnish for desserts.
 
Here’s a neat culinary trick: steep 1/4 cup chopped fresh mint leaves in warmed milk for 20 minutes, strain out the leaves, and use the mint-flavored milk to flavor homemade ice creams, custards or sauces. And another one, for mint glaze: steep 3 sprigs of crushed mint in 1/8 cup of heated cider vinegar for 6 minutes, then add ½ cup honey. Use this mixture to glaze duck, goose, lamb or ribs.
 
Opal Basil
Opal basil has lovely, deep purple leaves that are full-flavored and fragrant. The leaves add brilliant color and a peppery basil taste to oils, vinegars or jelly. It is a striking, fresh addition to salads, pestos and pastas. Opal basil’s flavor blends well with many other herbs, especially lemon thyme, Italian parsley, chives and garlic. It is delicious paired with eggplant, peppers, carrots, steamed broccoli or onions. Use it anywhere you would use green basil.
 
Rosemary
Rosemary is a beautiful evergreen herb native to the Mediterranean. It’s a member of the same family as mint, and its pungent, somewhat piney flavor also enhances sweetness.

In French cooking, rosemary is a traditional ingredient in bouquet garni, as is thyme. Add rosemary to the dough when baking bread or making dumplings or cookies. To release the aromatic oils, crush or mince rosemary leaves before sprinkling or rubbing them into roasting meats such as beef, chicken, fish or lamb. Always use rosemary sparingly or it will overpower other flavors.
 
Rosemary can be infused into butter, oil or wine and used as a marinade or for basting. The upright variety of rosemary makes a great skewer for meat or seafood. Toss rosemary onto the charcoal in the grill to add extra flavor.

Sorrel
Sorrel looks somewhat like spinach but has a very sour lemony flavor. It has been a European favorite for centuries. It is also known as dock, patience and sour grass. Sorrel is high in vitamin C, which explains its citrus taste. Chefs puree sorrel into a cooked green sauce served over fish fillets. Add sorrel to your favorite soup recipe to liven it up, or try a little sorrel on your sandwich instead of lettuce. Add fresh, young sorrel leaves to salad.
 
Thyme
Thyme (pictured) tastes delicately green with a faint clove aftertaste. There are a number of varieties and flavors. Even though its leaves are small, they have a very peppery flavor and should be used with a light touch. Its flavor blends well with lemon, garlic and basil.
 
Thyme is essential to clam chowder and Cajun gumbo. Add a little minced thyme to stuffing and meatloaf. Rub thyme over pork roast or whole poultry before cooking. Because thyme will not lose its flavor in slow cooking, it’s a good choice for bean and lentil dishes. Or baste fish with fresh lemon juice and minced thyme.
 
For a quick vegetable dip, combine 1 cup sour cream or yogurt with a little minced fresh thyme, chives, basil and dill.
 
Edible Flowers
Edible flowers are primarily used for garnish, although many of the edible flower varieties have wonderful flavors, textures and colors that enhance many dishes. It seems odd to eat a flower, but we do it every day when we eat cauliflower or broccoli. All flowers of fresh herbs are edible flowers, so their taste may resemble the taste of the herb on which they grow.

A scattering of edible flowers makes food look as wonderful as it tastes. Edible flowers can transform a simple green salad into an exquisite edible bouquet. Chive blossoms and calendula petals help to create a charming salad. Borage sprigs and flowers can be floated in cool summer drinks. The peppery flavor of nasturtium leaves and flowers are good in sandwiches as well as salads. Add minced nasturtium petals to your deviled egg mixture or omelet recipe to add color and zest.
 
Minced edible flowers can be added to cheese spreads; herb butters; and batters for waffles, pancakes, and crepes. Dip squash or zucchini blossoms in cornmeal or flour batter and fry. Pansies and roses are beautiful when crystallized in sugar and used to garnish cakes or pastries. Freeze flowers in ice cube trays and pop into drinks. Red sage flowers are a delicate and sweet garnish for desserts.

A Quick Guide to Fresh Herbs

Basil
Tomato sauce and pesto come to mind for most people, but basil is the most versatile herb of all. It has a rich, slightly peppery flavor of mint and cloves, and it’s delicious raw or cooked.
 
Basil makes a sensational garnish and comes in many different flavors, such as Thai (anise) and opal basil. It’s the no. 1 herb for salads, stews, marinades—or just about anything. Never store basil at a temperature below 50 degrees or it will turn black. Blanch basil in boiling water for three to five seconds to retain the nice color when making pesto.
 
Chives
Chives are a member of the onion family. They are usually chopped fine and sprinkled on top of many foods, from baked potatoes to vichyssoise. Chives can be used whenever raw onion is called for, especially in delicate recipes that could be overpowered by the onion flavor.
 
Chives are wonderful in omelets, soups, salads and vegetables and should be added at the last minute of cooking. Use them as decorative garnish or as you would string to tie together veggies, cheeses or asparagus. Combine chunks of cucumber, tomato, feta cheese, minced chives and a splash of olive oil for a tasty peasant-style salad.
 
Dill
Dill is a member of the parsley family and a distant cousin to the carrot. It is best known for its flavor because the “crown” is used in pickling. Dill “weed” are the leaves, which are used in a variety of ways—but should not be used with a heavy hand.
 
Use scissors instead of a knife when mincing to preserve the flavor. Use it raw or add at the end of cooking because heat diminishes the flavor. Mix dill with butter, cream cheese, cottage cheese or yogurt to make a spread or dip. Add fresh dill to your favorite potato salad recipe. Combine dill with lemon butter on broiled fish.
 
Lemon Grass
This tropical perennial with grass-like leaves is 4 to 6 feet tall and exudes a lemon aroma when rubbed between the fingers. The grassy leaves may be steeped in hot water to make a hot lemon drink, and they are also used in flavoring fish stocks or curries, but they should be removed before serving. The lower stalk is the most important part of the herb, because it’s where the flavor is concentrated.
 
The lower stalk can be peeled, finely chopped or pounded to release its flavor for stir-fry dishes, fish or poultry sauces. It is used extensively in Thai, Vietnamese and other Asian dishes. 

Marjoram
Marjoram is a mild, fragrant herb and a close kin to oregano, although its flavor is subtler and sweeter. Marjoram is an important seasoning for sausage or for scenting lamb before cooking. Add marjoram to your favorite soup, stew, salad or omelet recipe, or use it as a substitute for oregano in pizza and lasagna recipes. Try it sprinkled over roasted veggies too.
 
Mint
Mint comes in a variety of flavors such as peppermint, apple mint, orange mint, lemon mint and chocolate mint, but the no. 1 seller is spearmint. It’s an important flavoring in Middle Eastern, Indian and Asian cuisines and in dishes featuring fatty cuts of lamb and pork.
 
Mint is famous in the South for cool mint juleps, and a spring of mint in tea or water makes a refreshing drink on hot summer days. You can also add mint to your favorite fruit salad or green salad recipes, and mint makes a lovely garnish for desserts.
 
Here’s a neat culinary trick: steep 1/4 cup chopped fresh mint leaves in warmed milk for 20 minutes, strain out the leaves, and use the mint-flavored milk to flavor homemade ice creams, custards or sauces. And another one, for mint glaze: steep 3 sprigs of crushed mint in 1/8 cup of heated cider vinegar for 6 minutes, then add ½ cup honey. Use this mixture to glaze duck, goose, lamb or ribs.
 
Opal Basil
Opal basil has lovely, deep purple leaves that are full-flavored and fragrant. The leaves add brilliant color and a peppery basil taste to oils, vinegars or jelly. It is a striking, fresh addition to salads, pestos and pastas. Opal basil’s flavor blends well with many other herbs, especially lemon thyme, Italian parsley, chives and garlic. It is delicious paired with eggplant, peppers, carrots, steamed broccoli or onions. Use it anywhere you would use green basil.
 
Rosemary
Rosemary is a beautiful evergreen herb native to the Mediterranean. It’s a member of the same family as mint, and its pungent, somewhat piney flavor also enhances sweetness.

In French cooking, rosemary is a traditional ingredient in bouquet garni, as is thyme. Add rosemary to the dough when baking bread or making dumplings or cookies. To release the aromatic oils, crush or mince rosemary leaves before sprinkling or rubbing them into roasting meats such as beef, chicken, fish or lamb. Always use rosemary sparingly or it will overpower other flavors.
 
Rosemary can be infused into butter, oil or wine and used as a marinade or for basting. The upright variety of rosemary makes a great skewer for meat or seafood. Toss rosemary onto the charcoal in the grill to add extra flavor.

Sorrel
Sorrel looks somewhat like spinach but has a very sour lemony flavor. It has been a European favorite for centuries. It is also known as dock, patience and sour grass. Sorrel is high in vitamin C, which explains its citrus taste. Chefs puree sorrel into a cooked green sauce served over fish fillets. Add sorrel to your favorite soup recipe to liven it up, or try a little sorrel on your sandwich instead of lettuce. Add fresh, young sorrel leaves to salad.
 
Thyme
Thyme (pictured) tastes delicately green with a faint clove aftertaste. There are a number of varieties and flavors. Even though its leaves are small, they have a very peppery flavor and should be used with a light touch. Its flavor blends well with lemon, garlic and basil.
 
Thyme is essential to clam chowder and Cajun gumbo. Add a little minced thyme to stuffing and meatloaf. Rub thyme over pork roast or whole poultry before cooking. Because thyme will not lose its flavor in slow cooking, it’s a good choice for bean and lentil dishes. Or baste fish with fresh lemon juice and minced thyme.
 
For a quick vegetable dip, combine 1 cup sour cream or yogurt with a little minced fresh thyme, chives, basil and dill.
 
Edible Flowers
Edible flowers are primarily used for garnish, although many of the edible flower varieties have wonderful flavors, textures and colors that enhance many dishes. It seems odd to eat a flower, but we do it every day when we eat cauliflower or broccoli. All flowers of fresh herbs are edible flowers, so their taste may resemble the taste of the herb on which they grow.

A scattering of edible flowers makes food look as wonderful as it tastes. Edible flowers can transform a simple green salad into an exquisite edible bouquet. Chive blossoms and calendula petals help to create a charming salad. Borage sprigs and flowers can be floated in cool summer drinks. The peppery flavor of nasturtium leaves and flowers are good in sandwiches as well as salads. Add minced nasturtium petals to your deviled egg mixture or omelet recipe to add color and zest.
 
Minced edible flowers can be added to cheese spreads; herb butters; and batters for waffles, pancakes, and crepes. Dip squash or zucchini blossoms in cornmeal or flour batter and fry. Pansies and roses are beautiful when crystallized in sugar and used to garnish cakes or pastries. Freeze flowers in ice cube trays and pop into drinks. Red sage flowers are a delicate and sweet garnish for desserts.

Join Us for Toddler Tuesdays at Central Market Fort Worth

Who: Toddlers ages 2 to 5 years old
What: 30 minutes of organized exercise and play (taught by certified instructors) followed by a healthy snack demo and sampling
When: Every Tuesday starting March 27
Time: 10-10:30 am and 10:45-11:15 am
Where: Central Market Fort Worth patio. (In case of rain, class will meet in the Community Room on the second floor.)

Space is limited, and reservations are taken on a first-come, first-served basis, so call the store at 817-989-4700 to reserve your child’s spot for one of two free classes offered every Tuesday morning. Please arrive 10 minutes before the class to sign in.
 
What is Stretch-n-Grow?
According to Baylor College of Medicine, children today have a much shorter life expectancy than their parents for the first time in 200 years because of the epidemic of obesity. Toddlers and preschoolers should have 30-60 minutes of structured physical activity daily, not just free play, in order to prevent the risks of being overweight. There are 260,000 deaths in the U.S. every year caused by physical inactivity.

Stretch-n-Grow is a FUNtastic fitness and nutrition program created in 1992 and now the world’s largest network of children’s fitness professionals. Their objective is to improve the fitness level of their participants (and their families!) and teach them the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the perils of inactivity.

Join Us for Toddler Tuesdays at Central Market Fort Worth

Who: Toddlers ages 2 to 5 years old
What: 30 minutes of organized exercise and play (taught by certified instructors) followed by a healthy snack demo and sampling
When: Every Tuesday starting March 27
Time: 10-10:30 am and 10:45-11:15 am
Where: Central Market Fort Worth patio. (In case of rain, class will meet in the Community Room on the second floor.)

Space is limited, and reservations are taken on a first-come, first-served basis, so call the store at 817-989-4700 to reserve your child’s spot for one of two free classes offered every Tuesday morning. Please arrive 10 minutes before the class to sign in.
 
What is Stretch-n-Grow?
According to Baylor College of Medicine, children today have a much shorter life expectancy than their parents for the first time in 200 years because of the epidemic of obesity. Toddlers and preschoolers should have 30-60 minutes of structured physical activity daily, not just free play, in order to prevent the risks of being overweight. There are 260,000 deaths in the U.S. every year caused by physical inactivity.

Stretch-n-Grow is a FUNtastic fitness and nutrition program created in 1992 and now the world’s largest network of children’s fitness professionals. Their objective is to improve the fitness level of their participants (and their families!) and teach them the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the perils of inactivity.

Get Ready for Bathing Suit Season With Emerald Labs Weight Loss Health

It was warm enough to lay out by my pool yesterday, though I had no intention of doing so. It won’t be long, however, before that sort of activity is unavoidable. This caused me to realize that it was time to start replacing winter naps with springtime walks, heavy meals with crunchy veggies and whole grains, and forgiving warm-up pants with sundresses and – gasp – shorts. Better get movin’ down to Healthy Living and pay a visit to Jill, who always greets me with an exciting new product and a renewed sense of hope for my health regime.

Jill explains that we now carry an exciting new line of supplements from Emerald Laboratories. This is not your normal diet pill with a host of possible side effects to worry about. Emerald’s Weight Loss Health is a raw, whole food-based formula that actually contains probiotics (I was shocked to learn this), digestive enzymes, a superfood blend that includes African mango (which Dr. Oz is currently hyping), and a decaf green tea blend that won’t make you jitter. It’s like a little miracle pill, but of course we know there is no such thing. Keep up your usual healthy diet and exercise routine in order for this product to really work its magic.

It’s on sale right now at the Dallas Lovers store for only $29.99 for a 30-day supply. I started mine today, not wanting to waste a single minute now that beautiful weather is upon us. I have a feeling I’ll be expected at the pool before I finish the bottle.

Get Ready for Bathing Suit Season With Emerald Labs Weight Loss Health

It was warm enough to lay out by my pool yesterday, though I had no intention of doing so. It won’t be long, however, before that sort of activity is unavoidable. This caused me to realize that it was time to start replacing winter naps with springtime walks, heavy meals with crunchy veggies and whole grains, and forgiving warm-up pants with sundresses and – gasp – shorts. Better get movin’ down to Healthy Living and pay a visit to Jill, who always greets me with an exciting new product and a renewed sense of hope for my health regime.

Jill explains that we now carry an exciting new line of supplements from Emerald Laboratories. This is not your normal diet pill with a host of possible side effects to worry about. Emerald’s Weight Loss Health is a raw, whole food-based formula that actually contains probiotics (I was shocked to learn this), digestive enzymes, a superfood blend that includes African mango (which Dr. Oz is currently hyping), and a decaf green tea blend that won’t make you jitter. It’s like a little miracle pill, but of course we know there is no such thing. Keep up your usual healthy diet and exercise routine in order for this product to really work its magic.

It’s on sale right now at the Dallas Lovers store for only $29.99 for a 30-day supply. I started mine today, not wanting to waste a single minute now that beautiful weather is upon us. I have a feeling I’ll be expected at the pool before I finish the bottle.

Fresh Herbs: Cooking and Storage Tips

Cooking Tips

  • When using fresh herbs instead of dried herbs, use three times the amount for which the recipe calls.
  • Always rinse herbs, pat dry with paper towel and strip leaves from the stem before using. Use the stems in stocks and soups for additional flavoring.
  • Always add fresh herbs in the last few minutes of cooking to retain their best flavor (except for fresh bay leaves and thyme, which don’t lose their flavor during long cooking).
  • Chopping, mincing or crushing fresh herbs releases their full flavor.
  • Store fresh herbs in a container in your crisper section of the refrigerator. Never store fresh basil below 50 degrees. When you store basil in your refrigerator, put the original container in which the basil came inside one or two larger plastic containers to insulate it from the cold. Basil can also be stored at room temperature if you place the stems in a glass of water and mist the leaves.

 
Storage Ideas

  • If you don’t plan to use your fresh herbs at once, you can blanch the leaves in boiling water for three to five seconds and refrigerate or freeze. The herbs will retain their nice color.
  • Puree herbs in a blender or food processor with your favorite oil and refrigerate or freeze.
  • Puree herbs with a small amount of water and freeze in ice cube trays. Store ice cubes in a plastic bag and use to season soups, sauces and beverages.
  • Crush herbs and add to 12 ounces of white wine vinegar with a whole peeled clove of garlic. Let steep for a few days to two weeks. Strain and use vinegar in salads, as a marinade, or add to cooking water when steaming vegetables.